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" Any two rectangles are to each other as the products of their bases by their altitudes. "
Elements of Geometry - Page 175
by George Albert Wentworth - 1881 - 250 pages
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Treatise on Elementary Geometry

William Chauvenet - 1905 - 336 pages
...for its limit. AE AE Therefore, by II., Theorem, Doctrine of Limits, = - (-H, 42, and III., 14.) 6. COROLLARY. Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. Note. In these propositions, by " rectangle" is to be understood " surface of the rectangle." PROPOSITION...
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Manual of the Free High Schools of Wisconsin

Wisconsin. Department of Public Instruction - Education - 1906 - 124 pages
...to two given lines. 101. Parallelograms having equal bases and equal altitudes are equivalent. 102. Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. 103. Two rectangles are to each other as the products of their bases by their altitudes. 104-107. The...
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Geometry: Plane Trigonometry. Chain Surveying. Compass Surveying. Transit ...

International Correspondence Schools - Building - 1906 - 634 pages
...40. Since any of the sides of a rectangle can be considered as the base, it follows that the area of two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. 41. The areas of any two rectangles are to each other as the products of their bases by their altitudes....
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Plane Geometry

Edward Rutledge Robbins - Geometry, Plane - 1906 - 268 pages
...(?), ES EG and — will approach — as a limit (?). ER EF .-. = (?) (242). EG EF JED 369. THEOREM. Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. (Explain.) 370. THEOREM. Any two rectangles are to each other as the products of their bases by their...
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Plane and Solid Geometry

Edward Rutledge Robbins - Geometry - 1907 - 428 pages
...limit (?), ES EG and — will approach — as a limit (?). EB EF ^ ' EG EF (242). ^ ' QED 369. THEOREM. Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. (Explain.) 370. THEOREM. Any two rectangles are to each other as the products of their bases by their...
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New Plane Geometry

Webster Wells - Geometry, Plane - 1908 - 206 pages
...Theorem of Limits. 276. Since either side of a rectangle may be taken as the base, it follows that Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. PROP. II. THEOREM 277. Any two rectangles are to each other as the products oj their bases by their...
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New Plane and Solid Geometry

Webster Wells - Geometry - 1908 - 336 pages
...Theorem of Limits. 276. Since either side of a rectangle may be taken as the base, it follows that Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. PROP. II. THEOREM 277. Any two rectangles are- to each other as the products oj their bases by their...
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Exercises in Geometry

Grace Lawrence Edgett - Geometry - 1909 - 104 pages
...ratio is 4, find the whole line. BOOK IV. AREAS OF POLYGONS Group I. Ratio of Areas of Rectangles 1. Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes. 2. Find the ratio of a rectangular lawn 72 yards by 49 yards to a grass turf 18 inches by 14 inches....
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Plane Geometry

Clara Avis Hart, Daniel D. Feldman - Geometry, Modern - 1911 - 328 pages
...altitudes by h and ft', respectively. Then P = b . h and B' = b '. h'. .-. — = ~^-- 480. Cor. m. (a) Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes, and (6) two rectangles having equal altitudes are to each other as their bases. — . — — OUTLINE...
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College Entrance Examination Papers in Plane Geometry

Geometry, Plane - 1911 - 192 pages
...the middle point of a line of given length whose extremities move along two perpendicular lines. 6. Two rectangles having equal bases are to each other as their altitudes, both when the latter are commensurable and incommensurable. 7. To construct a circle equivalent to...
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