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" Principles Of Human Knowledge 1. OBJECTS OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE.—It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either IDEAS actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are perceived by attending to the... "
Five Years in an English University - Page 445
by Charles Astor Bristed - 1852
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A Critical History of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval and Modern

Y. Masih - Philosophy - 1999 - 606 pages
...objects of human knowledge are either (a) "ideas actually imprinted on the senses; or else (b) ideas perceived by attending to the passions and operations of the mind; or lastly (c) ideas formed by help of memory and imagination, either compounding, dividing, or barely representing...
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Berkeley's Thought

George Sotiros Pappas - Biography & Autobiography - 2000 - 300 pages
...is thereby perceived. He may hold that, since in opening the main part of the Principles he writes: It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the...senses, or else such as are perceived by attending to passions and operations of the mind, or lastly ideas formed by help of memory and imagination, . ....
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Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues: Background Source Materials

C. J. McCracken, I. C. Tipton - Philosophy - 2000 - 314 pages
...Principles (1) to be reminiscent of the opening sections of the first chapter of Book 2 of Locke's Essay. "It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge," Berkeley declares, "that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses, or else such as are...
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Skepticism and the Veil of Perception

Michael Huemer - Philosophy - 2001 - 236 pages
...objects, but only ideas in the mind. He begins with the following statement: It is evident to anyone who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge...mind, or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination.55 This is the very first sentence following the introduction in his Principles of Human...
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Understanding Philosophy of Science

James Ladyman - Philosophy - 2002 - 312 pages
...object but its own ideas' (Locke 1964: Book IV, i, I); Berkeley says 'the objects of human knowledge are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses,...attending to the passions and operations of the mind' (Berkely 1975: Part I, I); and Hume says '[a]ll the perceptions of the human mind resolve themselves...
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The Passive Eye: Gaze and Subjectivity in Berkeley (via Beckett)

Branka Arsi? - Philosophy - 2003 - 228 pages
...of human knowledge, in accordance with Berkeley's classif1cation, can be divided into "objects . . . actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as...mind; or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination,"125 and if the first two groups of objects can be apprehended as "one and the same" group,...
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Pyrrhonian Skepticism

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - Philosophy - 2004 - 248 pages
...body of the book, where Berkeley offers an empiricist's catalogue of the objects of human knowledge ("it is evident to any one who takes a survey of the...lastly ideas formed by help of memory and imagination . . ."), we find ourselves on a very different footing. Section 1 of the introduction draws a contrast...
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The Concept of Consciousness

Edwin B. Holt - Philosophy - 2005 - 365 pages
...follows: " It is evident to anyone who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are ideas actually imprinted on the senses; or else such...mind ; or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination—either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally perceived in the...
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The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley

Kenneth Winkler - History - 2005 - 474 pages
...careful to distinguish this from what, in the second paragraph of the Principles, he had described as "such as are perceived by attending to the passions and operations of the mind", which he later calls notions. The distinction is as follows. Ideas are always sensory-, they are either...
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The Cambridge University Calendar

University of Cambridge - Universities and colleges - 1845 - 492 pages
...pomatum videre religio est." CELL. x. 15. THURSDAY, February 13. 9—11J. Translate into GREEK PROSE : IT is evident to any one who takes a survey of the...attending to the passions and operations of the mind, OP lastly ideas formed by help of memory and imagination, either compounding, dividing, or barely representing,...
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