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" Principles Of Human Knowledge 1. OBJECTS OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE.—It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either IDEAS actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are perceived by attending to the... "
Five Years in an English University - Page 445
by Charles Astor Bristed - 1852
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A New Theory of Vision and Other Select Philosophical Writings

George Berkeley - Idealism - 1922 - 346 pages
...naked, undisguised ideas. OF THE PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE PART I I. Objects of human knowledge. — [It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the...human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually (i) imprinted on the senses, or else such as are (2) perceived by attending to the passions and operations...
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The Development of Berkeley's Philosophy

George Alexander Johnston - Berkeley, George, bishop, 1685-1753 - 1923 - 414 pages
...meaning that Berkeley himself intended. The sentence in question runs thus : " It is evident to anyone who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge,...perceived by attending to the passions and operations of t" mind ; or, lastly, ideas formed by help of memory• and imagination:" 1 1 Principles, 1. With...
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The Philosophical Review, Volume 33

Jacob Gould Schurman, James Edwin Creighton, Frank Thilly, Gustavus Watts Cunningham - Electronic journals - 1924 - 658 pages
...It has been held that Berkeley makes three classes of ideas, whereas there are only two plus objects "such as are perceived by attending to the passions and operations of the mind; . . . ." Several reasons for the reinterpretation are given, and on grammatical grounds it must be...
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Modern Classical Philosophers: Selections Illustrating Modern Philosophy ...

Benjamin Rand - Philosophy, Modern - 1924 - 924 pages
...great want of. GEORGE BERKELEY (1685-1753) A TREATISE CONCERNING THE PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE* i. IT is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects oj human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are...
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Practical Psychology for Students of Education

Charles Fox - Education - 1928 - 230 pages
...originally forgotten, but now remembered, to the number originally remembered. EXTRACT FROM BERKELEY It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the...passions and operations of the mind ; | or lastly, ideas f ormed by help of memory and imagination — either compounding, dividing, or barely representing...
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Theistic Monism: An Answer to the Question "Is There God?" Reached by ...

Joseph Evans - God - 1928 - 352 pages
...only of its own ideas. It was Berkeley who gave this wider interpretation. ' It is evident to anyone who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge,...operations of the mind ; or, lastly, ideas formed by the help of memory and imagination. . . . But besides all that endless variety of ideas or objects...
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A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

George Berkeley - Idealism - 1928 - 168 pages
...ideas actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are pJijr-fTUerl hy aHpndingr tr. Hip paging and Operations of the mind; or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination—either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally perceived in the...
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A Beginner's History of Philosophy, Volume 2

Herbert Ernest Cushman - Philosophy - 1919 - 452 pages
...the first sentence in \asPrindples : " It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprinted...operations of the mind ; or, lastly, ideas formed by the help of memory and imagination — either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally...
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Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

Lewis White Beck - History - 1966 - 332 pages
...Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge <I A. No UNPERCEIVED IDEAS It is evident to anyone who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either ideas (1) actually imprinted on the senses, or else such as are (2) perceived by attending to the passions...
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Towards a Romantic Conception of Nature: Coleridge's Poetry Up to 1803 : a ...

Hendrik Roelof Rookmaaker - Poetry - 1984 - 232 pages
...the same words and wholly to the same Purpose, that the Objects of human Knowledge are either Ideas imprinted on the Senses, or else such as are perceived...operations of the mind, or lastly Ideas formed by the help of Memory and Imagination, either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally...
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