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" I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name as "madness" when it is considered that opposition to reason deserves that name, and is really madness; and there is scarce a man so free from it but that if he should always, on all occasions, argue... "
Philosophical beauties selected from the works of John Locke - Page 225
by John Locke - 1802
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Philosophical Beauties Selected from the Works of Jean Locke...containing ...

John Locke - 1844 - 272 pages
...a little farther, who would trace this sort of madness to the root it springs from, and so cxpluin it, as to show whence this flaw has its original in...some cases he constantly does, would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than civil conversation. I do not here inc;ui when he is under the power of an unruly...
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Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official, Volume 2

Sir William Henry Sleeman - India - 1844 - 566 pages
...less subject, and from which hardly any individual can entirely free himself. " There is," he says, scarce a man so free from it, but that if he should...some cases he constantly does, would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than civil conversation. I do not here mean when he is under the power of an unruly...
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An essay concerning human understanding. With the notes and illustr. of the ...

John Locke - 1849 - 588 pages
...its original in very sober and rational minds, and wherein it consists. 4. A degree of madness. — I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name...some cases he constantly does, would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than civil conversation. I do not here mean when he is under the power of an unruly...
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The Purpose of Existence, Popularly Considered, in Relation to the Origin ...

Evolution, Mental - 1850 - 390 pages
...opposition to Reason," they assume the form which Locke calls madness ; and further observes, that " there is scarce a man so free from it, but that if he should always, on all occasions, argue and do as in some cases he constantly does, would not be thought fitter for bedlam than civil conversation"...
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Locke's Essay on the Human Understanding

JOHN MURRAY - 1852 - 786 pages
...has its original in very sober and rational minds, and wherein it consists. A degree of madness.—I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name...and there is scarce a man so free from it but that [he] would be thought fitter for bedlam than civil conversation if he should always—on all occasions—argue...
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Address at the Annual Meeting of the Educational Institute of Scotland ...

James Bryce - Education - 1852 - 630 pages
...sort of madness (for such an opposition to reason deserves that name, and is really madness), so that there is scarce a man so free from it but that, if...occasions, argue or do as in some cases he constantly does — and that in the steady calm course of his life — who would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than...
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The Philosophical Works of John Locke, Volume 1

John Locke - Philosophy - 1854 - 560 pages
...its original in very sober and rational minds, and wherein it consists. 4. A Degree of Madness. — I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name...some cases he constantly does, would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than civil conversation. I do not here mean when he is under the power of an unruly...
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Locke's essays. An essay concerning human understanding. And A treatise on ...

John Locke - 1854 - 536 pages
...original in very sober and rational minds, and wherein it consists. SECT. 4. A degree of madness. — I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name...always, on all occasions, argue or do as in some cases lie constantly does, would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than civil conversation. I do not here...
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Englische grammatik ...: -3. Th. Die lehre von der wort-und satzfügung. 1.-2 ...

Eduard Adolf Ferdinand Maetzner - English language - 1865 - 632 pages
...(Вить., Hud., Ep. 159.). Benjamin's mess was five times so muck as any of theirs (GEN. 43, 34.). I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name os madness (LOCKE, Hum. Underst.). In a world so full of temptation as this (MACAUL-, Essays IV. 146.)....
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English Grammar: Methodical, Analytical, and Historical. With a ..., Volume 3

Eduard Adolf Ferdinand Maetzner - 1874 - 598 pages
...guard (B( TL. Hud.. Ep. 159.) Benjamin's mess was fire limes so much as any of theirs (GEN. 43, 34.). I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name as madness (LocKE, Hum. Underst.). In a world so full of temptation as this (Mu ATL , Essays IV. 146.). He was...
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