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" The velocity of a fluid issuing from an orifice in the bottom of a vessel kept constantly full, is equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling through a space equal to the depth of the orifice below the surface of the fluid... "
The Civil-engineer & Surveyor's Manual - Page 34
by Michael McDermott - 1879 - 586 pages
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Lectures on Natural and Experimental Philosophy: Considered in It ..., Volume 3

George Adams - Science - 1794 - 540 pages
...of circumflances. The velocity of the water fpouting from a fmall hole in the bottom of the veflel, is equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling vertically from a height equal to that of the furface of the fluid above the aperture. The fame law...
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The Repertory of arts and manufactures [afterw.] arts ..., Volume 15

Repertory of arts, manufactures and agriculture - 1801 - 504 pages
...demonftrated, that the velocity with which water fpouts from an aperture in the bottom or fide of a veflel, is equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling through the height of the fluid above the orifice. This demonftration, however, as Mr. Atwood obferves, is...
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The Mathematical Repository, Volume 2

Thomas Leybourn - Mathematics - 1801 - 480 pages
...quantity of water difcharged determined on the fup. pofition that the velocity with which it fpouts is equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling through half the height of the furface of the water above the aperture. But neither this hypothefis, nor any...
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The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Volume 2, Issue 2

Isaac Newton - Celestial mechanics - 1803 - 410 pages
...to 25. And therefore that running water in paffing through the hole itfelf has a velocity downwards equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling through half the height of the ftagnant water in the veflel, nearly. But, then, after it has run out, it is...
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The new encyclopędia; or, Universal dictionary ofarts and sciences, Volume 1

Encyclopaedia Perthensis - 1807 - 758 pages
...and backwards, STIC Sf. 129 radius. Cor.'i. He thence, fliows, fliat the vtlj. city of the piilfes is equal to that which .a. heavy body would acquire, in falling clown half the altii tude of that homogeneous atmofphere ; audtherci fore, that a]l pulics move iqually...
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An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Mechanics: In Five Books ...

William Marrat - Mechanics - 1810 - 512 pages
...time. When tin- pump is effectual, the velocity of the effluent water can never exceed the velocity which a heavy body would acquire in falling through a space equal to the difference between 32 feet and the length of the vertical tube, or 32— k for a greater velocity would...
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The Principles of Hydrostatics: Designed for the Use of Students in the ...

Samuel Vince - Hydrostatics - 1812 - 140 pages
...of the stream, or at the vena contracta, the velocity is found, by this theory, to be .that which a body would acquire in falling through a space equal to the depth of the fluid. To determine therefore, b'y . theory, the time in which a vessel empties itself, we must know...
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A Treatise on Mills, in Four Parts: On circular motion. On the maximum of ...

John Banks - Mechanical engineering - 1815 - 202 pages
...of water flowing through holes in the bottom or side of a vessel, ought to be equal to the velocity which a heavy body would acquire in falling through a space equal to the distance *•' i . between the surface of the water and the place where it is discharged. Hence, at...
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A Treatise of Mechanics, Theoretical, Practical, and Descriptive, Volume 1

Olinthus Gregory - Mechanical engineering - 1815 - 604 pages
...subduplicate ratio of 2 to I , he concluded that the velocity of the effluent water in the orifice was equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling through half the altitude. But all this is true only of the mean velocity; for there is no cause which can...
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Encyclopaedia Britannica: Or, A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ...

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1823 - 876 pages
...described with that altitude as its radius. " Cor. i. He thence shows, that the velocity of the pulses is equal to that which a heavy body would acquire in falling down half the altitude of that homogeneous atmosphere ; and therefore, that all pulses move equally...
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