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" Multiply each payment by its term of credit, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments ; the quotient will be the average term of credit. "
The Progressive Higher Arithmetic: For Schools, Academies, and Mercantile ... - Page 351
by Horatio Nelson Robinson - 1860 - 456 pages
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A Theoretical and Practical Arithmetic: Designed for Common Schools and ...

Daniel Leach, William Draper Swan - Arithmetic - 1851 - 280 pages
...price of each ingredient and the quantity are given, — RULE. Multiply each ingredient by its price, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the ingredients. The quotient will be the price of the mixture. 1. A grocer mixed 10 pounds of tea worth...
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Introduction to the National Arithmetic ...

Benjamin Greenleaf - 1851 - 332 pages
...of the whole. Hence the following RULE. — Multiply each payment by the time before it is due, then divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments, and the quotient will be the true time required. NOTE 1. — This is the rule usually adopted by merchants,...
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School Arithmetic: Analytical and Practical

Charles Davies - 1852 - 346 pages
...the payments.) Hence, to find the mean time, Multiply each payment by the time before it becomes due, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments : the quotient will be the mean time. EXAMPLES. 1. B. owes A $600 ; $200 is to be paid in two months, $200 in four months, and...
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The University Arithmetic: Embracing the Science of Numbers, and Their ...

Charles Davies - Arithmetic - 1852 - 438 pages
...due, equal to ? Hence, to find the mean time, Multiply each payment by the time before it becomes due, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments : tht juotient will be the mean time. EXAMPLES. i 1. B owes A $600: $200 is to be paid in two months,...
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The U.S. Law Cabinet

Isaac Ridler Butts - 1852 - 596 pages
...AVERAGE PAYMENT OF DIFFERENT PAYMENTS. RULE. — Multiply each Debt by the time in which it is Payable, and divide the Sum of the Products by the Sum of the Debts— as follows : fiought at 4 months' credit. When is the equated time qf payment ? 1851. Anfl....
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A Theoretical and Practical Arithmetic: Designed for Common Schools and ...

Daniel Leach - Arithmetic - 1853 - 626 pages
...price of each ingredient and the quantity are given, — RULE. Multiply each ingredient by its price, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the ingredients. The quotient will be the price of the mixture. 1. A grocer mixed 10 pounds of tea worth...
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The Computist's Manual of Facts: And Merchant's and Mechanic's Calculator ...

Ezra S. Winslow - Business mathematics - 1853 - 264 pages
...Multiply the weight of the several particles by the squares of their distances from the axis of motion, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the weights ; the square root of the quotient will be the distance of the centre of gyration from the axis...
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The Practical Calculator; a Treatise on Arithmetic ...

C. W. Thornhill - 1854
...quantities and prices being given to find the mean price. RULE. — Multiply each quantity by its price, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the quantities. EXAMPLES. A grocer mixes 5 Ibs. of tea at Ss. Od. ; 7 Ibs. at 5s. Od. ; and 9 Ibs. at 6*....
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Indroduction to the National Arithmetic ...

Benjamin Greenleaf - 1854 - 340 pages
...of the whole. Hence the following RULE. — Multiply each payment by the time before it is due, then divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments, and the quolient will be the true time required. NOTE 1. — This is the rule usually adopted by merchants,...
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Introduction to arithmetic

Chambers W. and R., ltd - 1854
...Multiply each quantity by its price; then add the quantities in one sum and the products in another, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the quantities : the quotient is the average. Example. — I have bought two yards of cloth, at 10s. each...
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