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Entered at Stationers' Hall.

MATHEWS'

MATRICULATION MATHEMATICS:

BEING ALL THE PAPERS IN

ARITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA,

SET AT THE

MATRICULATION EXAMINATIONS OF THE LONDON

UNIVERSITY,

From 1844 to 1878 (inclusive).

WITH

Complete Answers to all the Questions,
Solutions in Arith. and Geom. Progression, and

Hints for Private Students.

BY

E. H. MATHEWS,

AUTHOR OF 'DEDUCTIONS FROM EUCLID, AND HOW TO WORK THEM,' ETC.

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APR 1879.

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PREFACE.

THIS book contains all the Questions set in Arithmetic and Algebra at the Matriculation Examinations of the London University, from the publication of the first Calendar in 1844 to the present time; and as it contains upwards of 1500 examples, carefully prepared by the highest authorities, the Author hopes that it will prove useful, not only to Students preparing for Matriculation, but to Students in Training Colleges, the Upper Forms of Public Schools, Pupil Teachers, and others.

The Introduction has been written principally for the benefit of Private Students, who are apt to slight the manner in which their work is done, providing they can obtain correct results. This, however, is a fallacy, for correct results unaccompanied by intelligible solutions are never accepted by examiners; on the contrary, the neat and methodical correct worker always obtains a good position.

No pains have been spared to make the Answers as accurate as possible, and the Author here desires to thank professional friends, especially the Rev. R. Pratt, M.A. (formerly of St. John's Coll., Cambridge), for valuable assistance and advice.

Any corrections or suggestions will be thankfully received through the Publishers.

LONDON, Oct. 1878.

E. H. M.

INTRODUCTION.

"A good set of Questions points out to him who is examined the principles or facts which are most important for him to know."— ENGLISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATION.

THE Matriculation Examination of the London University is honourably esteemed by the highest authorities, and is well known to be* equal to the present examination for Degrees in some British Universities. It is becoming more important and more largely attended every year, e.g.

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The number of passes have seldom been above, more frequently below, half the number presented, owing to the wholesome severity of the examination,' i.e., 'Candidates shall not be approved by the Examiners unless they have shown a competent knowledge in each of the subjects' (Vide REGULATIONS). As an illustration of this rule, 52 Candidates were rejected in one subject only, in June 1877.

The annual average of failures in Arithmetic and Algebra is nearly 20 per. cent. Hence the importance of supplying the Student with a collection of the Questions already set

* Speech of Earl Granville at the Presentation for Degrees.

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