Observations on Reversionary Payments: On Schemes for Providing Annuities for Widows, and for Persons in Old Age; on the Method of Calculating the Values of Assurances on Lives; and on the National Debt. Also, ... a Postscript on the Population of the Kingdom. The Whole New Arranged, and Enlarged by the Addition of Algebraical and Other Notes, ...

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T. Cadell & W. Davies, 1812
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Page 131 - ... it is by no means strictly proper to consider our diseases as the original intention of nature. They are, without doubt, in general our own creation. Were there a country where the inhabitants led lives entirely natural and virtuous, few of them would die without measuring out the whole period of...
Page 53 - The original number of persons which had settled in the four provinces of New England in 1643 was 21,200. Afterwards it was calculated that more left them than went to them. In the year 1760 they were increased to half a million. They had, therefore, all along doubled their number in 25 years.
Page 86 - This rule can want no explication or proof, after what has been already said. If, therefore, the number of annual settlers in a town at every age could be ascertained ; a perfect Table of Observations might be formed for that town, from Bills of mortality containing an account of the ages at which all die in it. But no more can be...
Page 159 - By this means the houses being kept up, did of necessity enforce a dweller; and the proportion of land for occupation being kept up, did of necessity enforce that dweller not to be a beggar or cottager, but a man of some substance, that might keep hinds and servants, and set the plough on going.
Page 157 - ... ported by them." Ib, p. 37. See an account of Norfolk, in some respects similar to this, in my Appeal to the Public on the Subject of the National Debt, p. Q3, &c. I can scarcely think of any thing that should be more alarming than such accounts. — How astonishing is it that our parliament, instead of applying any remedy to these evils, should chuse to promote them, by passing every year, bills almost without number for new inclosures ° ? The 0 I have here in view inclosures of open fields...
Page 75 - ... dying every year at any particular age, and above it, must be equal to the number of the living at that age. The number for example dying every year at all ages from the beginning to the utmost extremity of life, must, in such a situation, be equal to the whole number born every year.
Page 189 - The handcuffs and fetters in which the hero commonly appears at the end of the second, or the beginning of the third...
Page 131 - From this comparison, it appears, with how much truth great cities have been called the graves of mankind. It must also convince all who consider it, that according to the observation, at the end of the...
Page 252 - In it he taught with great clearness and exactness the conditions needful for the formation of rates of mortality ; the manner of forming them with complete geometrical precision ; of deducing a corresponding table of the present...
Page 99 - Secondly, the bills give the number dying annually between 20 and " 30 greater than between 30 and 40 ; but this being, a circumstance which '' does not exist in any other register of mortality, and, undoubtedly, owing to "some accidental and local causes, the decrements were made equal between ' 22 and 40; preserving, however, the total of deaths between 20 and 40 ' the same that the bills give them.

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