A popular and practical treatise on masonry and stone-cutting

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Hurst, Chance, and Company, 1828 - Masonry - 111 pages
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Page xiii - To make a triangle of which the sides shall be equal to three given straight lines, but any two whatever of these must be greater than the third (20.
Page xxiii - When you have proved that the three angles of every triangle are equal to two right angles...
Page xii - PROBLEM. To draw a straight line at right angles to a given straight line, from a given point in the same.
Page 42 - ABC, and its developement, each into the same number of equal parts at the points, 1, 2, 3. Through the points 1, 2, 3, &c. in the semi-circular arc, and in its...
Page 4 - ... sum of the angles at the base ABC, ACB, to the tangent of half their difference. About A as a centre, with AB the greater side for a distance, let a circle be described, meeting AC, produced in E, F, and BC in D ; join DA, EB, FB ; and draw FG parallel to BC, meeting EB in G. The angle EAB (32. 1.) is equal to the sum of the angles at the base, and the angle EFB at the circumference is equal to the half of EAB at the centre (20. 3.); therefore EFB is half the sum of the angles at the base ; but...
Page 9 - P' R' are right angles ; therefore the triangle v' P' R' is equal to the triangle m' P' S', and the remaining angles of the one equal to the remaining angles of the other, each to each ; hence the angle P' v' R' is equal to the angle P'm'S'. Again, because O' /
Page xxiii - To draw a straight line through a given point parallel to a given straight line. Let A be the given point, and BC the given straight line ; it is required to draw a straight line through the point A, parallel to the straight line BC. In BC take any point D, and join AD ; and at the point A...
Page 82 - Any right linę drawn. from the centre to the circumference. Radius of a Cylinder. The radius of a circle which is the profile of the cylinder. Radius of a Sphere. The right line extending from the centre to the surface. Radius of Curvature. The radius of a circle which has the same curvature as the curve at the point to which this radius belongs. Radiating Joints. Those joints which -tend to a centre. Rafters. All the timbers in the sides of a roof which...
Page 1 - Through the points 1, 2, 3, &c. in the semi-circular arc, and in its developement, draw straight lines parallel to AE, and let the parallel lines through 1, 2, 3, in the arc A, B, C, meet FG, in p, q, r, &c.
Page 82 - ... short posts of timber, as the small quarterings instead of partitions over the heads of doors. PURLINES. The timbers which support the spars or common rafters of a roof. Q.UADRANT. The fourth part of a circle. QUANTITY OF BATTER. The angular distance between the plumb-line and the line of batter. RADIUS. A right line, of which if one end be fixed in a certain point, the other, if moved round, may be made to coincide with all the points of another line, or with the points of a surface. RADIUS...

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