Rudimentary architecture

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1848 - 120 pages

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Page 56 - The capital has two rows of leaves, eight in each row, so disposed that of the taller ones composing the upper row, one comes in the middle, beneath each face of the abacus, and the lower leaves alternate with the upper ones, coming between the stems of the latter ; so that in the first or lower tier of leaves there is in the middle of each face a space between two leaves occupied by the stem of the central leaf above them . Over these two rows is a third series, of four leaves, turned so as to support...
Page 21 - ... one whole triglyph and two halves of triglyphs. In such intercolumniation the number of the triglyphs is double the number of the columns, minus one. Further, it is evident that as there must be a triglyph over every column, the triglyphs must regulate the intercolumniation. The width of the intercolumns cannot be at all less than the proportion above mentioned ; neither can it be increased, except by introducing a second triglyph, — and if a second triglyph, a second metope also, over each...
Page 57 - In that example the abacus is square, and the upper row of leaves are of the kind called water-leaves, from their resemblance to those of water-plants, being broad and flat, and merely carved upon the vase or body of the capital. The next stage of progress or transition was to add larger curling leaves and volutes to support the angles of the abacus ; but then if the abacus remained square as before, it would either overhang the capital too much in the centre of each face of it, or would not cover...
Page 22 - The mutules are thin plates or shallow blocks attached to the under side or soffit of the corona, over each triglyph and each metope, with the former of which they correspond in breadth, and their soffits or under-surfaces are wrought into three rows of...
Page 71 - When, you have seen one green field," says Johnson, " you have seen all green fields ;" and so we may say of Greek temples, — when you have seen one or two of them, you have seen all of them. However they may differ from one another as to the treatment of the Order adopted for them, the number of their columns, and mere particulars of that kind, they resemble each other very nearly in all leading points. Not only were their plans invariably parallelograms, but alike also as to proportion, forming...
Page 34 - Here then a difficulty presented itself that demanded some ingenuity to overcome it, and hardly can we sufficiently admire the happy expedient by which it was surmounted. It was necessary to give the capital at the angle two adjoining voluted faces, so that it should agree with those of the other columns both in front and on the flank of the building. This was accordingly effected by placing the volute at the angle, diagonally, so as to obtain there two voluted surfaces placed immediately back to...
Page 71 - The number of the columns in front was invariably an. even one, as otherwise there would be no middle intercolumn ; but on the flanks of the edifice, where there was no entrance, the number of the intercolumns was an even, and that of the columns an uneven one, so that a column came in the centre of these side elevations. As to the mode in which the front influenced the sides...
Page 61 - As may be supposed from this greatly increased depth of the cornice, it consists of a greater number of mouldings beneath the corona, for that and the cymatium over it invariably retain their places as the crowning members of the whole series of mouldings. To the dentels of the Ionic cornice is added a row of modillions, immediately beneath and supporting the corona. These modillions are ornamental blocks, curved in their under surface somewhat after the manner of the letter S turned thus...
Page 88 - ENTASIS. — A slightly convex curvature given in execution to the outline of the shaft of a column, just sufficient to counteract and correct the appearance, or fancied appearance, of curvature in a contrary direction (ie concavely), which might else take place and cause the middle of the shaft to appear thinner than it really is. Entasis is therefore nothing positive : it is not intended to show itself, for were it to do so, — were there to be any visible swelling, — it would be a deformity...

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