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" ... unless it be in cases of treason, nor to reject one witness because he is single, or always to believe two witnesses, if the probability of the fact does upon other circumstances reasonably encounter them ; for the trial is not here simply by witnesses,... "
A pocket encyclopędia, or library of general knowledge - Page 169
by Edward Augustus Kendall - 1811
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The Constitution of England, Or An Account of the English Government;: In ...

Jean Louis de Lolme - Constitutional history - 1775 - 462 pages
...reafonably encounter them; for the Trial " is not here fimply by witnefles, but by • nay> it may fo fall out, that a Jury " upon their own knowledge may know a " thing to be falfe that a vvitnefs fwore " to be true, or may know a witnefs to be " incompetent or incredible,...
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The constitution of England; or, An account of the English government

Jean Louis de Lolme - Constitutions - 1784 - 564 pages
...encounter them ; for the trial is " not here simply by witnesses, but by Jury : " nay, it may so fall out, that a jury upon " their own knowledge may know...him — and may give their verdict " accordingly." If the verdict pronounces no* guilty, the prisoner is set at liberty, and cannot, on any pretence,...
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Pocket Encyclopedia: Or, A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ..., Volume 3

Edward Augustus Kendall - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1811
...encounter them ; for the trial is not here simply by witnesses, but by jury ; nay , it may so fall out, that a jury upon their own knowledge may know...accordingly." It is a striking and pleasing observation of i >e Lolme, that " the consequence of the institution of Juries is, that no man in England, ever meets...
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The Constitution of England: Or, An Account of the English Government; in ...

Jean Louis de Lolme - Constitutional history - 1816 - 602 pages
...encoun" ter them; for the trial is not here simply by " witnesses, but by jury : nay, it may so fall " out, that a jury upon their own knowledge may " know...witness swore " to be true, or may know a witness to be in" competent or incredible, though nothing be " objected against him—and may give their ver" diet...
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The History of the Common Law of England: And An Analysis of the Civil Part ...

Matthew Hale, Sir Matthew Hale - Civil law - 1820 - 580 pages
...in Pref. 10. trial is NOT here simply BY WITNF.SSKS, but by jury. Nay, it may so fall out, that the jury upon their OWN knowledge, may know a thing- to...against him ; and may give their verdict accordingly (/). Twelflhly, when the whole twelve men are AGREED, then, and not till then, is their verdict to...
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The History of the Common Law of England: And An Analysis of the Civil Part ...

Matthew Hale, Sir Matthew Hale - Civil law - 1820 - 582 pages
...in I'ref. 10. trial is NOT here simply BY WITNESSES, bnt by jury. Nay, it may so fall out, that the jury upon their OWN knowledge, may know a thing to be FALSE, that a witness swore to be true; or may kuow a witness to be incompetent, or incredible, though nothing be objected against him ; and may give...
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The British Prose Writers...: De Lolme on the constitution

British prose literature - 1821 - 444 pages
...reasonably encounter them ; for the trial is not here simply by witnesses, but by jury; nay, it may so fall out, that a jury upon their own knowledge may know...against him — and may give their verdict accordingly." * If the verdict pronounces not guilty, the prisoner is set at liberty, and cannot, on any pretence,...
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The Constitution of England: In which it is Compared Both with the ...

Jean Louis de Lolme - Constitutional history - 1826 - 326 pages
...encounter them; for the trial is not here simply by witnesses, but by jury : nay, it may so fall out, ihat a jury, upon their own knowledge, may know a thing...may know a witness to be incompetent or incredible, thongh nothing be objected against him— and may gire their verdict accordingly.* If the verdict pronounces...
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The Nautical Magazine: A Journal of Papers on Subjects Connected ..., Volume 41

Naval art and science - 1872 - 1114 pages
...reasonably encounter them ; for the trial is not hero simply by witnesses, but by jury ; nay, it may so fall out that a jury, upon their own knowledge, may know...against him — and may give their verdict accordingly." In all cases where a jury is employed, then, they alone determine which party has the truth upon his...
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Universal History: From the Creation of the World to the Beginning ..., Volume 6

Lord Alexander Fraser Tytler Woodhouselee - World history - 1835 - 364 pages
...if the probability of the fact does upon other circumstances reasonably encounter them. It may fall out that a jury, upon their own knowledge, may know a thing to be false which a witness has sworn to be true; or may know a witness to be incompetent or incredible though...
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