Nellie's Memories: A Domestic Story

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Macmillan, 1914 - 464 pages
 

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Page 31 - Short glimpses of a breast of snow ; What though no rule of courtly grace To measured mood had trained her pace, A foot more light, a step more true, Ne'er from the heath-flower dashed the dew ; E'en the slight hare-bell raised its head, Elastic from her airy tread...
Page 206 - And thro' the moss the ivies creep, And in the stream the long-leaved flowers weep, And from the craggy ledge the poppy hangs in sleep. Why are we weigh'd upon with heaviness, And utterly consumed with sharp distress, While all things else have rest from weariness? All things have rest : why should we toil alone, We only toil, who are the first of things, And make perpetual moan, Still from one sorrow to another thrown : Nor ever fold our wings, And cease from wanderings...
Page 17 - Morte d'Arthur.— SIR THOMAS MALORY'S BOOK OF KING ARTHUR AND OF HIS NOBLE KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE. The original Edition of CAXTON, revised for Modern Use. With an Introduction by Sir EDWARD STRACHEY, Bart. pp. xxxvii., 509. "It is with perfect confidence that we recommend this edition of the old romance to every class of readers.
Page 394 - THERE is no flock, however watched and tended But one dead lamb is there ! There is no fireside, howsoe'er defended, But has one vacant chair ! The air is full of farewells to the dying, And mournings for the dead ; The heart of Rachel, for her children crying, Will not be comforted...
Page 351 - ... a man shall leave his father and mother, and shall cleave unto his wife ; and they shall be one flesh.
Page 40 - And wilt thou leave me thus ? Say nay ! say nay ! And wilt thou leave me thus, That hath loved thee so long, In wealth and woe among ? And is thy heart so strong As for to leave me thus ? Say nay ! say nay...
Page 379 - In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life, Be not like dumb, driven cattle! Be a hero in the strife!
Page 27 - We have erred and strayed from Thy ways like lost sheep," and ending, " that we may hereafter live a godly, righteous, and sober life.
Page 32 - E'en the slight hare-bell raised its head, Elastic from her airy tread : What though upon her speech there hung The accents of the mountain tongue, Those silver sounds, so soft, so dear, The listener held his breath to hear.

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