The Cambridge History of English Literature: The nineteenth century. II

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Sir Adolphus William Ward, Alfred Rayney Waller
The University Press, 1916 - English literature
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Page 90 - But be his My special thanks, whose even-balanced soul, From first youth tested up to extreme old age, Business could not make dull, nor passion wild ; Who saw life steadily, and saw it whole ; The mellow glory of the Attic stage, Singer of sweet Colonus, and its child.
Page 30 - At last I heard a voice upon the slope Cry to the summit, " Is there any hope ? " To which an answer peal'd from that high land, But in a tongue no man could understand ; And on the glimmering limit far withdrawn God made Himself an awful rose of dawn.
Page 28 - PART II. THERE she weaves by night and day A magic web with colours gay. She has heard a whisper say, A curse is on her if she stay To look down to Camelot. She knows not what the curse may be, And so she weaveth steadily, And little other care hath she, The Lady of Shalott. And moving thro' a mirror clear That hangs before her all the year, Shadows of the world appear.
Page 95 - Wandering between two worlds, one dead, The other powerless to be born, With nowhere yet to rest my head, Like these, on earth I wait forlorn. Their faith, my tears, the world deride; I come to shed them at their side.
Page 95 - Not as their friend, or child, I speak ! But as, on some far northern strand, Thinking of his own Gods, a Greek In pity and mournful awe might stand Before some fallen Runic stone — For both were faiths, and both are gone.
Page 101 - St Paul and Protestantism (1870), Literature and Dogma (1873), God and the Bible (1875) and Last Essays on Church and Religion (1877).
Page 296 - ... to toll, and Thomas Newcome's hands outside the bed feebly beat time. And just as the last bell struck, a peculiar sweet smile shone over his face, and he lifted up his head a little, and quickly said, " Adsum ! " and fell back. It was the word we used at school, when names were called ; and lo, he. whose heart was as that of a little child, had answered to his name, and stood in the presence of The Master.
Page 74 - s. Ending, therefore, and preparing once more to quit England, I venture to leave in your hands this book, the most mature of my works, and the one into which my highest convictions upon Life and Art have entered...
Page 441 - Diana of the Crossways (1885), One of Our Conquerors (1891), Lord Ormont and his Aminta...

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