The Mechanical Engineer's Pocket-book: A Reference Book of Rules, Tables, Data, and Formulae, for the Use of Engineers, Mechanics, and Students

Front Cover
Wiley, 1895 - Engineering - 1100 pages
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Contents

Long Measure
17
Square Measure
18
Board and Timber Measure
20
Compound Units
27
01833846 CT CT ON A CO 00 20 2
29
7
31
Addition Multiplication
33
of the Spiral
50
Geometrical Problems of Construction
57
Spherical Polygon
61
Solution of Plane Triangles
68
Polygons Table of Polygons
71
FormulŠ for Integration
74
Mathematical Tables
80
Reciprocals of Numbers 1 to 2000
101
Circumferences and Areas of Circles Diameters 1 to 1000
108
Contents of Pipes and Cylinders Cubic Feet and Gallons
121
Number of Barrels in Cylindrical Cisterns and Tanks
127
Hyperbolic Logarithms
156
Chemical Elements
163
46
169
46
175
Miscellaneous Materials
181
Rivets
204
Weight of Bolts with Heads
210
Iron Wire Size Strength
217
Electric Cables
223
Circumferences of Circles in Feet and Inches from 1 inch to 32 feet 11
231
Measure of time
236
Measurement of Elongation
243
Strength of Castiron Columns
250
Built Columns
256
Safe Loads on Steel Beams
264
Quadrilateral Parallelogram etc
271
Spacing of Steel I Beams
273
Size of Beams for Floors
281
Stresses in Steel Plating under Water Pressure
287
Initial Strain on Bolts
292
Aluminumtin Alloys
300
American Woods
306
Shearing Strength of Woods
312
Holding Power of Nails Spikes Bolts and Screws
315
Alloys
318
Alloys used in Brass Foundries
326
Alloys containing Antimony
335
Cordage Technical terms
341
Laminated Steel Springs
347
Helical Springs for Cars
353
Helical Springs for Cars
354
Diameter of Rivets
360
Riveting Pressures
363
Chemistry of Foundry Iron
369
Chemistry of Wrought Iron
373
Mixture of Cast Iron with Steel
375
Staybolt Iron
379
FormulŠ for Unit Strains in Structures
381
FormulŠ for Unit Strains in Structures
385
Youoxidizing Process of Annealing
389
Influence of Annealing upon Magnetic Capacity
396
Steel for Springs Axles
402
Electric Conductivity
403
Aluminum Steel
409
Compressed Steel
410
MECHANICS
415
Parallelogram of Forces
416
Circular Ring
419
Centre of Oscillation
421
Centre of Percussion
422
Mass
427
Wedge
435
Pratt or Whipple Truss
443
High Temperatures judged by Color
454
Absolute Zero
461
Conduction and Convection of Heat
463
Expansion of Gases
479
Flow of Air in Pipes
485
Force of the Wind
492
Heating of Air by Compression
498
Loss due to Excess of Pressure
500
Aircompressors
504
Efficiency of Compressedair Transmission
508
Experiments with Blowers
514
435
518
Diameter of Blastpipes
520
Loss of Energy in Compressed
525
Moisture in Atmosphere
531
Overhead Steampipes
537
Properties of
543
Blower System of Heating and Ventilating
545
213
549
Compressibility of Water
551
Flow in Open and Closed Channels
557
Bazins Formula
563
Table of Flow of Water in Circular Pipes
573
Airbound Pipes
579
Cone
583
Flow through Rectangular Orifices
584
Measurement of Discharge by means of Nozzles
586
Turbine Wheels
591
Dimensions of Turbines
597
Sizes of Directacting Pumps
603
The Deane Pump
604
Efficiency of Centrifugal and Reciprocating Pumps
609
Pulsometer
612
Quantity of Water Delivered by the Hydraulic
615
Energy of Water under Pressure
617
Hydraulic Riveting Machines
618
Horsemanure as Fuel
643
Producergas from One Ton of Coal
649
Space Required for a Watergas Plant
656
606
657
607
658
438
664
214 215
667
Table of the Properties of Steam
668
Sizes of Steampipes for Marine Engines
674
609
685
Strength of Steamboilers
700
U S Rule for Allowable Pressures
706
The Hawley Down draught Furnace
712
Removal of Hard Scale
718
Strains Caused by Cold Feedwater
727
612
732
Rate of Combustion Due to Height of Chimney
733
Steel Chimneys
740
614
742
Calculation of Mean Effective Pressure
744
439
747
Effect of Compression
751
616
758
To Draw Clearance on Indicatordiagram
760
Receiver Space
766
Sequence of Cranks
772
Storing Steam Heat
789
Cylinderhead Bolts
795
Tapered Connectingrods
801
Resistance to Bending
808
Crankshafts with Centrecrank and Doublecrank Arms
814
Weight of Flywheels
820
Wirewound Flywheels
824
Flywheel or Shaftgovernors
838
An Evaporative Surface Condenser
844
The Otto Gasolineengine
850
Firebrick Arches
856
Dimensions of Some American Locomotives 859862
862
Proportions of Pulleys
873
Belting Practice FormulŠ for Belting
878
489
879
To Find the Length of Belt
884
43
889
Proportion of Gearwheels
890
Approximation by Circular Arcs
896
Various Formula for Strength
902
439
903
Efficiency of Chainblocks
907
440
912
Selfacting Inclined Plane
913
402
922
226 227
926
Coefficient of Friction
928
Laws of Friction of welllubricated Journals
934
Mercurybath Pivot
940
442
952
THE MACHINE SHOP
953
Results with Millingmachines
959
Power used in Machineshops
965
Taps for Machinescrews
970
Keys for Gearing
977
Operations of a Refrigeratormachine
983
THE STEAM ENGINE
989
Test Trials of Refrigeratingmachines
990
Performance of a 75ton Refrigeratingmachine
996
Coefficient of Fineness
1002
Resistance per Horsepower for different Speeds
1006
Efficiency of the Propeller
1012
Particulars of Threestage Expansionengines
1018
403
1019
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
1024
643
1028
Standard of Resistance of Copper Wire
1030
Conductors in Series
1031
410
1034
Fusion of Wires
1037
Wiring Formula for Incandescent Lighting
1044
Lightingpower of Arclamps
1050
415
1054
Working Current of a Storagecell
1056
Safe Load on Whiteoak Beams
1062
Mathematics
1070
Performance of a Highspeed Locomotive
1076
279a
1083
443
1084
Discount
1087
Compound Interest
1088
643
1089
445
1090
726
1093
867
1095
889
1097
620
1098
28
1099
456
Annuities
621
700
648
457
1063
966
871
775
Tables of Amount Present Values etc of Annuities
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 756 - The conditions of the boiler and furnace in all respects should be, as nearly as possible, the same at the end as at the beginning of the test. The steam pressure should be the same, the water level the same, the fire upon the grates should be the same in quantity and condition, and the walls, flues, etc., should be of the same temperature.
Page 758 - The analysis of the flue gases is an especially valuable method of determining the relative value of different methods of firing, or of different kinds of furnaces. In making these analyses great care should be taken to procure average samples, since the composition is apt to vary at different points of the flue...
Page 758 - Smoke Observations. — It is desirable to have a uniform system of determining and recording the quantity of smoke produced where bituminous coal is used. The system commonly employed is to express the degree of smokiness by means of percentages dependent upon the judgment of the observer. The committee does not place much value upon...
Page 98 - Troy pound of the Mint. It is of brass of unknown density, and therefore not suitable for a standard of mass. It was derived from the British standard Troy pound of 1758 by direct comparison.
Page 758 - Calorific Tests and Analysis of Coal. — The quality of the fuel should be determined either by heat test or by analysis, or by both. The rational method of determining the total heat of combustion is to burn the sample of coal in an atmosphere of oxygen gas, the coal to be sampled as directed in Article XV of this code.
Page 819 - ... a = area of piston in square inches, n = number of strokes per minute, or twice the number of revolutions per minute.
Page 482 - If any number of forces acting at a point can be represented in magnitude and direction by the sides of a POLYGON taken in order, they are in equilibrium.
Page 92 - Measure . . 60 seconds = 1 minute ; 60 minutes = 1 hour ; 24 hours = 1 day ; 7 days = 1 week ; 365 days = 1 year ; 366 days = 1 leap year.
Page 758 - S refer to the proportions of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and sulphur, respectively, as determined by the ultimate analysis. It is desirable that a proximate analysis should be made, thereby determining the relative proportions of volatile matter and fixed carbon. These proportions furnish an indication of the leading characteristics of the fuel and serve to fix the class to which it belongs. As an additional indication of the characteristics of the fuel, the specific gravity should be determined....
Page 757 - From this sample two one-quart, air-tight glass preserving jars, or other air-tight vessels which will prevent the escape of moisture from the sample, are to be promptly filled, and these samples are to be kept for subsequent determinations of moisture and of heating value and for chemical analyses. During the process of quartering, when the sample has been reduced to about 100 pounds, a quarter to a half of it may be taken for an approximate determination of moisture.

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