Modern Classical Philosophers: Selections Illustrating Modern Philosophy from Bruno to Bergson

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Benjamin Rand
Houghton Mifflin, 1924 - Philosophy, Modern - 893 pages
 

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Page 83 - A LAW OF NATURE, (lex naturalis,) is a precept, or general rule, found out by reason, by which a man is forbidden to do that, which is destructive of his life, or taketh away the means of preserving the same; and to omit that, by which he thinketh it may be best preserved.
Page 97 - I authorize and give up my right of governing myself, to this man, or to this assembly of men, on this condition, that thou give up thy right to him, and authorize all his actions in like manner.
Page 78 - ... mind than another; yet when all is reckoned together, the difference between man, and man, is not so considerable, as that one man can thereupon claim to himself any benefit, to which another may not pretend, as well as he. For as to the strength of body, the weakest has strength enough to kill the strongest, either by secret machination, or by confederacy with others, that are in the same danger with himself.
Page 84 - From this fundamental law of nature, by which men are commanded to endeavour peace, is derived this second law; that a man be willing, when others are so too, as far forth, as for peace, and defence of himself he shall think it necessary, to lay down this right to all things; and be contented with so much liberty against other men, as he would allow other men against himself.
Page 335 - This connexion, therefore, which we feel in the mind, this customary transition of the imagination from one object to its usual attendant, is the sentiment or impression from which we form the idea of power or necessary connexion.
Page 259 - It is evident to anyone who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses, or else such as are perceived by attending to the passions and operations of the mind, or lastly ideas formed by help of memory and imagination, either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally perceived in the aforesaid ways.
Page 213 - It is an established opinion amongst some men, that there are in the understanding certain innate principles ; some primary notions, KOU>O.\ Iwoiai, characters, as it were, stamped upon the mind of man, which the soul receives in its very first being, and brings into the world with it.
Page 259 - And as several of these are observed to accompany each other, they come to be marked by one name, and so to be reputed as one thing. Thus, for example, a certain colour, taste, smell, figure and consistence, having been observed to go together, are accounted one distinct thing, signified by the name "apple.
Page 805 - Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults, To give in evidence. What then ? what rests ? Try what repentance can : what can it not ? Yet what can it, when one cannot repent ? O wretched state ! O bosom, black as death ! O limed soul, that, struggling to be free, Art more engaged ! Help, angels, make assay ! Bow, stubborn knees ! and, heart, with strings of steel, Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe : All may be well ! [retires and kneels.
Page 226 - ... the dominion of man in this little world of his own understanding, being much-what the same as it is in the great world, of visible things, wherein his power, however managed by art and skill, reaches no farther than to compound and divide the materials that are made to his hand but can do nothing towards the making the least particle of new matter, or destroying one atom of what is already in being.

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