Page images
PDF
EPUB

NEW

PRACTICAL ALGEBRA;

ADAPTED ΤΟ

THE IMPROVED METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

IN

SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES, AND COLLEGES

BY

JAMES B. THOMSON, LL. D.,

AUTHOR OF A SERIES OF MATHEMATICS.

NEW YORK:

CLARK & MAYNARD, PUBLISHERS,

5 BARCLAY STREET

1880.

THOMSON'S MATHEMATICAL SERIES.

I. A Graded Series of Arithmetics, in three Books, viz.:

New Illustrated Table Book, or Juvenile Arithmetic. and slate exercises. (For beginners.) 128 pp.

New Rudiments of Arithmetic.

With oral

Combining Mental with Written

Arithmetic. (For Intermediate Classes.) 224 pp.

New Practical Arithmetic. Adapted to a complete business education. (For Grammar Departments.) 384 pp.

II. Independent Books.

Key to New Practical Arithmetic. Containing many valuable suggestions. (For teachers only.) 168 pp.

New Mental Arithmetic. Containing the Simple and Compound Tables. (For Primary Schools.) 144 pp.

Complete Intellectual Arithmetic. Specially adapted to Classes in Grammar Schools and Academies. 168 pp.

III. Supplementary Course.

New Practical Algebra. Adapted to High Schools and Academies.

312 pp.

Key to New Practical Algebra. With full solutions. (For teachers only.) 224 pp.

New Collegiate Algebra. (In preparation.)

Complete Higher Arithmetic. (In preparation.)

**Each book of the Series is complete in itself.

Copyright, 1877, by JAMES B. THOMSON.

46+120

PREFACE.

IT

T has long been a favorite plan of the author to make a Practical Algebra-a Book combining the important principles of the Science, with their application to methods of business.

Several years have elapsed since he began to gather and arrange materials for this object. Many of the more important parts have been written and re-written and again revised, till they have found embodiment in the book now offered to the public.

In the execution of this plan, clearness and brevity in the definitions and rules have been the constant aim.

A series of practical problems, applying the principles already explained, has been introduced into the fundamental rules, thus relieving the monotony of the abstract operations, and illustrating their use.

The principles are gradually developed, and explained in a manner calculated to lead the pupil to a full understanding of the difficulties of the science, before he is aware of their existence.

The rules are deduced from a careful analysis of practical problems involving the principles in question-a feature so extensively approved in the author's Series of Arithmetics.

« PreviousContinue »