Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society

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Society, 1916 - Mathematics
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Page 208 - MATHEMATICS IN THE LOWER AND MIDDLE COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS OF VARIOUS COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN THE INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS"
Page 125 - A first hypothesis now presents itself: the subliminal self is in no way inferior to the conscious self; it is not purely automatic ; it is capable of discernment ; it has tact, delicacy; it knows how to choose, to divine. What do I say? It knows better how to divine than the conscious self, since it succeeds where that has failed.
Page 180 - Briggs, purposely to be there when these two so learned persons should meet. Mr. Briggs appoints a certain day when to meet at Edinburgh ; but failing thereof, the lord Napier was doubtful he would not come. It happened one day as John Marr and the lord Napier were speaking of Mr. Briggs ; ' Ah, John,' said Marchiston, ' Mr. Briggs will not now come.
Page 56 - F = — 1, ij = k, ji = — k, jk = i, kj = — i, ki = j, ik = — j.
Page 180 - My lord, I have undertaken this long journey purposely to see your person, and to know by what engine of wit or ingenuity you came first to think of this most excellent help into astronomy, viz. the logarithms ; but, my lord, being by you found out, I wonder nobody else found it out before, when now known it is so easy.
Page 205 - DUPUIS.— ELEMENTARY SYNTHETIC GEOMETRY OF THE POINT, LINE AND CIRCLE IN THE PLANE.
Page 187 - But, in the mean time, you defer too much to my ability in searching into this subject. What Descartes did was a good step. You have added much several ways, and especially in considering the colours of thin plates. If I have seen farther, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
Page 180 - London, was so surprised with admiration of them, that he could have no quietness in himself until he had seen that noble person the lord Marchiston, whose only invention they were : he acquaints John Marr herewith, who went into Scotland before Mr. Briggs, purposely to be there when these two so learned persons should meet. Mr. Briggs appoints a certain day when to meet...
Page 463 - New knowledge, when to any purpose, must come by contemplation of old knowledge in every matter which concerns thought ; mechanical contrivance sometimes, not very often, escapes this rule. All the men who are now called discoverers, in every matter ruled by thought, have been men versed in the minds of their predecessors, and learned in what had been before them. There is not one exception.
Page 180 - At the very instant one knocks at the gate ; John Marr hasted down, and it proved to be Mr Briggs, to his great contentment. He brings Mr Briggs into my Lord's chamber, where almost one quarter of an hour was spent, each beholding other with admiration, before one word was spoken. At last Mr Briggs began, — ' My Lord, I have undertaken this long journey...

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