A Beginner's History of Philosophy: Modern philosophy

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Houghton Mifflin, 1911 - Philosophy
 

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Page 176 - IT is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are perceived by attending to the passions and operations of the mind; or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination— either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally perceived in the aforesaid ways.
Page 179 - Some truths there are so near and obvious to the mind that a man need only open his eyes to see them. Such I take this important one to be, viz., that all the choir of heaven and furniture ' of the earth, in a word all those bodies which compose the mighty frame of the world, have not any subsistence without a mind...
Page 350 - A Moment's Halt — a momentary taste Of BEING from the Well amid the Waste — And Lo! — the phantom Caravan has reach'd The NOTHING it set out from — Oh, make haste!
Page 183 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Page 273 - NOTHING can possibly be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good without qualification, except a Good Will.
Page 176 - ... But besides all that endless variety of ideas or objects of knowledge, there is likewise Something which knows or perceives them; and exercises divers operations, as willing, imagining, remembering, about them. This perceiving, active being is what I call mind, spirit, soul, or myself; by which words I do not denote any one of my ideas, but a thing entirely distinct from them, wherein they exist, or, which is the same thing, whereby they are perceived; for the existence of an idea consists in...
Page 327 - Man, one harmonious soul of many a soul, Whose nature is its own divine control, Where all things flow to all, as rivers to the sea...
Page 189 - I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends ; and when, after three or four hours...
Page 189 - If we embrace this principle, and condemn all refin'd reasoning, we run into the most manifest absurdities. If we reject it in favour of these reasonings, we subvert entirely the human understanding. We have, therefore, no choice left but betwixt a false reason and none at all.
Page 161 - ... nothing in the objects themselves but powers to produce various sensations in us, and depend on those primary qualities, viz.

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