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" I speak not now of the public proclamation of informers, with a promise of secrecy and of extravagant reward ; I speak not of the fate of those horrid wretches who have been so often transferred from the table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory... "
Speeches of John Philpot Curran, Esq: With a Brief Sketch of the History of ... - Page 239
by John Philpot Curran - 1811
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The Beauties of the Press: With an Appendix, Containing the Speech of Arthur ...

Press, Dublin - Catholic emancipation - 1800 - 692 pages
...fccrecy and of extravagant reward : I fpeak not of the fate of thofe horrid wretches \\ ho have been fo often transferred from the table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory j I fpeak of what your own eyes have feen day after day during the courfe of this Commiffion from the...
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Speeches of John Philpot Curran: To which is Added Henry Gratten, Esq's ...

John Philpot Curran - Irish - 1805 - 448 pages
...fecrecy and of extravagant reward ; I fpeak not of the fate of thofe horrid wretches who have been fo often transferred from the table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory • I fpeak of what your own eyes have feen day after day during the courfe of this commiffion from the box...
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The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature

Tobias Smollett - English literature - 1806 - 576 pages
...promise of secrecy and of extravagant reward ; 1 speak not of the fate of those horrid wretches who huv« been so often transferred from the table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory. 1 speak of what your own eyes have seen day after day during the course of this commission from the...
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The Irish magazine, and monthly asylum for neglected biography. Feb.-Nov ...

1809 - 720 pages
...fecrecy and of extravagant reward : I fpealc not of the fate of thofe horrid wretches who have been fo often transferred from the table to the dock and from the dock to the pillory ; I fpeak of what your own eyes have feen day after day during the courte of this commiiTiun from the box...
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The London Quarterly Review, Volume 1

1810 - 438 pages
...and extravagance. 'I speak of what your own eyes have seen dayaftcr day during the «ourse of'this commission from the box where you are now sitting...upon their oaths that they had come from the very oetrt. .of government — from the castle, where they had been worked upon, by the fear of death and...
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The Columbian Reader,: Comprising a New and Various Selection of Elegant ...

Rodolphus Dickinson - Elocution - 1815 - 216 pages
...reward ; I speak not of the fate of those horrid wretches who have been so often transferred from I he table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory...after day during the course of this commission, from the.box where you are now sitting ; the number of horrid miscreants, who avowed upon their oaths, that...
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Recollections of Curran and Some of His Contemporaries

Charles Phillips - 1818 - 356 pages
...informers, with a promise of secrecy and of extravagant reward ; I speak not of the face, of those horrid wretches who have been so often transferred from the...avowed upon their oaths, that they had come from the seat of government — from the Castle, were they had been worked upon by the fear of death and the...
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The Monthly repository (and review)., Volume 13

1818 - 860 pages
...been so often transferred from the (witneis) table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory ; 1 speak of what your own eyes have seen, day after day...who avowed upon their oaths, that they had come from Jhc very seat of government, — from the Castle, where they had been worked upon bv the fear of death...
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The Life of the Right Honourable John Philpot Curran, Late Master ..., Volume 1

William Henry Curran - Lawyers - 1819 - 468 pages
...for informers with a promise of secrecy and extravagant reward.—I speak not of those unfortunate wretches, who have been so often transferred from the table to the dock, and from the dock to the pillory—I speak of what your own eyes have seen, day after day, during the course of this commission,...
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The Edinburgh magazine, and literary miscellany, a new series of ..., Volume 5

1819 - 610 pages
...for informers with a promise of secrecy and extravagant reword — 1 speak not of those unfortunate wretches, who have been so often transferred from the table to the dock, and from the clock to the pillory — t speak of what your own eyes have seen, day after day, during the course...
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