An Introduction to Algebra: Being the First Part of a Course of Mathematics : Adapted to the Method of Instruction in the American Colleges

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Howe & Spalding, 1820 - Algebra - 332 pages

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Page 298 - If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the square of the whole line is equal to the squares of the two parts, together with twice the rectangle contained by the parts.
Page 186 - Conversely, if the product of two quantities is equal to the product of two other quantities, the first two may be made the extremes, and the other two the means of a proportion.
Page 199 - If three quantities are proportional, the first is to the third, as the square of the first, to the square of the second ; or as the square of the second, to the square of the third.
Page 231 - Divide the first term of the dividend by the first term of the divisor, and write the result as the first term of the quotient.
Page 203 - What two numbers are those, whose difference, sum, and product, are as the numbers 2, 3, and 5, respectively ? Ans.
Page 42 - As the product of the divisor and quotient is equal to the dividend, the quotient may be found, by resolving the dividend into two such factors, that one of them shall be the divisor. The other will, of course, be the quotient. Suppose abd is to be divided by a. The factors a and Id will produce the dividend.
Page 215 - THE EXTREMES IS EQUAL TO THE SUM OF ANY OTHER TWO TERMS EQUALLY DISTANT FROM THE EXTREMES.
Page 81 - ... of this part. At the end of the third year, his original stock was doubled. What was that stock ? Ans.
Page 237 - Divide one of the quantities by the other, and the preceding divisor by the last remainder, till nothing remains ; the last divisor will be the greatest common measure.

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