Practical Marine Engineering for Marine Engineers and Students, with Aids for Applicants for Marine Engineers' Licenses

Front Cover
 

Contents

6 Watertube Boilers
69
Relative Advantages of Different Types of Boilers
83
Riveted Joints
85
Materials and Construction
104
3 Construction of Firetube Boilers
105
4 Construction of Watertube Boilers
127
5 Common Sizes and Dimensions of Scotch Boilers
129
6 Common Proportions of Scotch Boilers
130
7 Weights of Boilers
131
Boiler Mountings and Fire Room Fittings
133
2 Muffler
136
3 Stop Valve
137
4 Dry Pipe or Internal Steam Pipe
139
5 Feed Check Valve and Internal Feed Pipe
140
6 Surface and Bottom Blows
141
7 Steam Gages
143
8 Water Gage and Cocks
144
9 Hydrokineter Circulator
147
10 Hydrometer
150
11 Boiler Saddles
151
12 Boiler Lagging
152
2 Superheaters
161
Boiler Design in Accordance with the Rules of the United States Board of Supervising Inspectors of Steam Vessels
162
CHAPTER IV
191
2 Fire Brick
192
3 Atomization of the Oil
194
Mechanical BurnersThe Principles Employed in Their Manu facture and the Various Types Used
195
1 SchutteKoerting Burner
197
3 Howden Burner
198
4 Normand Burner
199
6 Peabody Burner
200
SECTION PAGE
201
Amounts of Air for Combustion
208
CHAPTER V
218
The Turbine for Ship Propulsion
231
6 Hydraulic Reduction Gearing
252
7 Electric Reduction Gear
256
Internal Combustion Engines Explosion
268
The Diesel Oil Engine Progressive Combustion
291
Producer Gas Installations
305
SECTION PAGE 36 Construction of Parsons Turbines
335
1 The Cylinder
336
2 The Rotor
338
4 Blading
340
Construction of Curtis Turbines
341
2 The Rotor
344
5 Blading
345
Other Turbines
346
General Details
347
2 Bearings
350
Western River Boat Practice
359
1 Doctor
365
Engine Fittings
369
2 Main Stop Valve
372
3 Arrangement of Throttle and Maneuvering Valves for Tur
374
4 Cylinder Drain Gear and Relief Valves
376
5 Starting Valves
377
6 Reversing Gear
378
7 Turning Gear
381
8 Joints and Packing
382
9 Reheaters
386
11 Counter Gear
389
13 Lagging
396
15 Turbine Micrometer Gage
413
16 Special Couplings
414
17 Kingsbury Thrust Bearing
417
Piping
423
2 Expansion Joint
426
3 Globe Angle and Straightway Valves
427
CHAPTER VII
430
Condensers
432
1 Condensers for Turbines
435
Air Pumps
438
Feed Pumps and Injectors
443
Auxiliaries for Turbines
448
2 Air Pumps
449
3 Lubricating System
458
4 Water Service
460
Feed Heaters
461
Filters
466
Evaporators
467
Direct Acting Pumps
470
Blowers or Fans
474
Separators
475
Ash Ejector and Ash Expeller
477
Pneumercator
479
1 Draft Indicator for Vessels
481
Time Firing Regulators
484
2 Indicator
487
3 Gong
488
Steain Traps
489
General Arrangement of Machinery
492
CHAPTER VIII
495
2 Double Ported Slide Valve
497
3 Piston Valve
498
4 Equilibrium Piston
502
5 Equilibrium Rings
505
6 Outside and Inside Valves
506
Valve Diagrams
507
2 Oval Valve Diagram
510
X
511
3 Bilgram Valve Diagram
516
4 Zeuner Valve Diagram
518
BraemmeMarshall Gear
524
Joy Valve Gear
528
Walschaert Valve Gear
529
Crank Valve Gear
531
Details of Stephenson Link Valve Gear
534
1 Eccentric and Strap and Eccentric Rod
535
2 Link
537
3 Link Block and Valve Stem
539
Valve Setting
541
1 Putting an Engine on the Center
543
2 Setting the Valve
544
3 Valve Setting from the Indicator Card
546
CHAPTER IX
548
Refrigeration by Freezing Mixtures
549
General Principles
550
Principal Features of Ammonia Refrigerating Apparatus
553
Carbonic Anhydride Refrigerating Machinery
559
Ethyl Chloride Machines
560
Sulphur Dioxide Machine
562
Refrigeration by the Expansion of Compressed Air
563
Principal Features of Compressed Air Refrigerating Apparatus
564
Operation and Care of Refrigerating Machinery
566
CHAPTER X
570
The Dynamo
576
Wiring and the Distribution of Light and Power
582
Lamps
586
Operation and Care of Electrical Machinery
588
2 Faults
590
CHAPTER XI
593
Screw Propellers
596
2 Varieties of Propellers
602
3 Materials
605
Paddle Wheels
609
Powering Ships
614
Reduction of Power When Towing or When Vessel is Fast to a Dock
617
Trial Trips
617
Special Conditions for Speed Trials
622
4 Additional Notes on Firing
654
5 Instructions for Burning Oil Fuel
655
6 Preparations for Getting Under Way in the Firerooms Watertube Boilers
656
7 Routine for Getting Under Way
657
8 Routine for Coming to Anchor
659
Care and Operation
661
10 Work in Dry Dock
663
SECTION PAGE 94 Emergencies and Casualties
664
Boiler Corrosion
676
Boiler Scale
688
Boiler Overhauling and Repairs
697
2 Leakage from the Joints of Boiler Mountings
702
3 Leakage About Shell Joints
703
4 Leakage at Internal Joints
704
5 Patches
705
6 Cracks and Holes
706
8 Tubes
707
9 Leakage About Stays and Braces
708
10 Bulging or Partial Collapse of Furnace or Combustion Chamber Plates
709
11 Split in Feed Pipe
710
Engine Overhauling Adjustment and Repairs
711
2 Pin Joints and Bearings
712
3 Crosshead Guides
714
4 Crosshead Marks
715
5 Lining Up
716
6 Valve Gear
722
9 Condenser
723
10 Air Pumps
724
12 Piping
725
Laying Up Marine Machinery
726
CHAPTER XIII
731
2 The Indicator Card and the Operation of the Valve Gear
734
3 Working Up Indicator Cards for Power
737
4 Combined Indicator Cards
745
Steam Engine Indicators
749
2 Reducing Motions
753
3 Taking an Indicator Card
756
Torsion Meters
758
1 Calibration of Shafting with Torsion Meter in Place
759
2 GaryCummings Torsion Meter
763
3 HopkinsonThring Torsion Meter
770
CHAPTER XIV
774
2 Heat
775
1 Constitution of Matter
780
SECTION PAGE 4 Total Heat in a Substance
786
5 Latent Heat in Passing from lce to Water
788
Steam Boiler Economy
789
2 Evaporation per Pound of Coal
792
3 Evaporation per Pound of Combustible
795
Steam Engine Economy
796
2 Relation of Expansion to Economy
805
3 Economy of the Actual Engine
807
Coal Consumption and Related Problems
808
Development of the Steam Turbine
813
1 Principles of Action
814
2 Superheat
816
Definitions
817
Velocity Diagrams and Work by Steam
821
Action of the Steam in Parsons Turbine
824
I12 Action of the Steam in Curtis Turbine
826
The Lever Safety Valve and the Safety Valve Problem
829
The Boiler Brace Problem
832
Strength of Boilers
837
Loss by Blowing Off
841
Gain by Feed Water Heating
844
The Proportions of Cylinders for Multiple Expansion Engines
845
Clearance and Its Determination
847
The Effect of Clearance in Modifying the Apparent Expansion Ratio as Given by the Point of CutOff
848
Engine Constant
850
Indicated Thrust
851
Reduced Mean Effective Pressure
852
Pressure on Main Guides
855
Force Required to Move a Slide Valve
856
Amount of Condensing Water Required
857
Work Done by Pumps
858
Discharge of Steam Through an Orifice
860
Computing Weights of Parts of Machinery
861
2 Approximation and Short Cuts
862
CHAPTER XV
869
2 Reduction of a Mixed Number to an Improper Fraction
870
3 Reduction of an Improper Fraction to a Mixed Number
871
5 Addition of Common Fractions
872
6 Subtraction of Fractions
874
7 Multiplication of Fractions
875
8 Division of Fractions
876
Decimal Fractions
879
2 To Reduce Decimals to Lower Terms
880
6 To Add Decimals
881
7 To Subtract Decimals
882
Percentage
883
Compound Numbers
886
3 Square Measure
887
8 The Metric System of Weights and Measures
888
10 Reduction of Compound Numbers
889
11 Addition of Compound Numbers
890
13 Multiplication of Compound Numbers
891
Duodecimals
892
Ratio and Proportion
894
2 Compound Proportion
897
Evolution and Involution
899
2 To Extract the Square Root
900
3 To Extract the Cube Root
902
Mathematical Signs Symbols and Operations
904
Geometry and Mensuration
908
2 Rectangle
909
4 Trapezoid
910
6 A Right Angled Triangle
911
7 Trapezium
912
8 Regular Polygons
913
12 Sector of Circle
915
13 Segment of Circle
916
14 Ellipse
917
16 Prism
920
17 Cylinder
921
18 Any Solid with a Constant Section Parallel to the Base Either Right or Oblique
922
20 Right Pyramid
923
22 Right Circular Cone
924
23 General Cone
925
SECTION PAGE 25 Frustum of General Pyramid
926
27 Frustum of General Cone
927
29 Volumes of Irregular Shape
928
30 Volume Generated by Any Area Revolving About an Axis
929
2 To Bisect the Distance Between Two Points
930
5 To Construct a Triangle Having Given the Three Sides
931
9 To Construct a Square Equivalent to a Given Rectangle
932
13 To Construct an Ellipse
933
14 To Construct Any Regular Polygon
934
16 To Develop the Surface of a Cylinder Which is Intersected by Another Cylinder the Two Axes Being in the Same Plane
935
17 To Develop the Surface of a Cone
936
Physics
937
3 Heat Unit
938
Mechanics
939
4 Moment of a Force
940
8 Energy
942
9 Conservation of Energy
943
12 Propositions in Statics
944
13 Mechanical Powers
946
14 Examples in Mechanics
952
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 779 - It has been seen that a heat unit is the quantity of heat required to raise one pound of water one degree in temperature...
Page 893 - In the multiplication of whole numbers, place the multiplier under the multiplicand, and multiply each term of the multiplicand by each term of the multiplier, writing the right-hand figure of each product obtained under the term of the multiplier which produces it.
Page 927 - A sphere is a solid bounded by a curved surface, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 870 - The number below the line is called the denominator, and shows into how many parts the number or thing is divided. The number above the line is called the numerator, and shows how many parts are expressed by the fraction.
Page 172 - Where P = working pressure in pounds per square inch. D = outside diameter of furnace in inches. L — length of section in inches. T = thickness of plate in sixteenths of an inch. Example.
Page 894 - The ratio between two numbers is simply their numerical relationship expressed as the quotient of the first divided by the second. Thus the ratio of 6 to 3 is 2 ; of 1.2 to 3 is .4; of 4 to 5 is .8, etc.
Page 162 - Multiply one-sixth (1-6) of the lowest tensile strength found stamped on any plate in the cylindrical shell by the thickness — expressed in inches or parts of an inch — of the thinnest plate in the. same cylindrical shell, and divide by the radius or half diameter — also expressed in inches — and the...
Page 177 - ... of the greatest pitch of the stay, riveted to the outside of the plates, and stays having one nut inside of the plate, and one nut outside of the washer or doubling strip. For T take 72 percent of the combined thickness of the plate and washer or plate and doubling strip.
Page 175 - The diameter of a screw stay shall be taken at the bottom of the thread, provided this is the least diameter.

Bibliographic information