Elements of Geometry: Containing the First Six Books of Euclid, with a Supplement on the Quadrature of the Circle, and the Geometry of Solids; to which are Added, Elements of Plane and Spherical Geometry

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W. E. Dean, 1845 - Euclid's Elements - 317 pages
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Page 50 - If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the square of the whole line is equal to the squares of the two parts, together with twice the rectangle contained by the parts.
Page 51 - If a straight line be divided into two equal parts, and also into two unequal parts; the rectangle contained by the unequal parts, together with the square of the line between the points of section, is equal to the square of half the line.
Page 16 - If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two sides of the other...
Page 28 - If a straight line fall upon two parallel straight lines, it makes the alternate angles equal to one another ; and the exterior angle equal to the interior and opposite angle upon the same side ; and likewise the two interior angles upon the same side together equal to two right angles.
Page 13 - From the greater of two given straight lines to cut off a part equal to the less.
Page 9 - A circle is a plane figure contained by one line, which is called the circumference, and is such that all straight lines drawn from a certain point within the figure to the circumference, are equal to one another.
Page 52 - If a straight line be bisected and produced to any point, the rectangle contained by the whole line thus produced and the part of it produced, together •with the square on half the line bisected, is equal to the square on the straight line which is made up of the half and the part produced.
Page 149 - ... cuts the base, the rectangle contained by the sides of the triangle is equal to the rectangle contained by the segments of the base, together with the square on the straight line which bisects the angle.
Page 30 - All the interior angles of any rectilineal figure, together with four right angles, are equal to twice as many right angles as the figure has sides.
Page 21 - Any two angles of a triangle are together less than two right angles, Let ABC be any triangle ; any two of its angles together are less than two right angles.

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