Report of the Examinations Conducted by the Council of Higher Education, Newfoundland

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Page 23 - ETHEREAL minstrel ! pilgrim of the sky ! Dost thou despise the earth where cares abound ? Or, while the wings aspire, are heart and eye Both with thy nest upon the dewy ground? Thy nest which thou canst drop into at will, Those quivering wings composed, that music still ! To the last point of vision, and beyond, Mount, daring warbler!
Page 68 - Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth ; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 66 - So as there is as much difference between the counsel that a friend giveth, and that a man giveth himself, as there is between the counsel of a friend and of a flatterer. For there is no such flatterer as is a man's self; and there is no such remedy against flattery of a man's self as the liberty of a friend.
Page 68 - Joying to hear the birds' sweet harmony, Which, therein shrouded from the tempest dread, Seemed in their song to scorn the cruel sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and high, The sailing pine ; the cedar proud and tall; The vine-prop elm ; the poplar never dry ; The builder oak, sole king of forests all; The aspen, good for staves ; the cypress funeral. The laurel, meed of mighty conquerors And poets sage; the fir that weepeth still; The willow, worn of forlorn paramours; The yew, obedient...
Page 23 - Leave to the Nightingale her shady wood; A privacy of glorious light is thine ; Whence thou dost pour upon the world a flood Of harmony, with rapture more divine ; Type of the wise who soar, but never roam ; True to the kindred points of Heaven and Home ! WORDSWORTH.
Page 66 - ... certain it is that whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thoughts, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up in the communicating and discoursing with another; he tosseth his thoughts more easily; he marshalleth them more orderly; he seeth how they look when they are turned into words. Finally, he waxeth wiser than himself, and that more by an hour's discourse than by a day's meditation.
Page 32 - If the square described on one side of a triangle be equal to the sum of the squares described on the other two sides, the angle contained by these two sides is a right angle.
Page 68 - All true Work is sacred ; in all true Work, were it but true hand-labour, there is something of divineness. Labour, wide as the Earth, has its summit in Heaven. Sweat of the brow ; and up from that to sweat of the brain, sweat of the heart ; which includes all Kepler calculations, Newton meditations, all Sciences, all spoken Epics, all acted Heroisms, Martyrdoms, — up to that 'Agony of bloody sweat,' which all men have called divine!
Page 2 - If, at a point in a straight line, two other straight lines, upon the opposite sides of it, make the adjacent angles together equal to two right angles, these two straight lines shall be in one and the same straight line.

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