A Natural Philosophy: Embracing the Most Recent Discoveries in the Various Branches of Physics, and Exhibiting the Application of Scientific Principles in Every-day Life : Adapted to Use with Or Without Apparatus, and Accompanied with Full Descriptions of Experiments, Practical Exercises, and Numerous Illustrations

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D. Appleton, 1863 - Physics - 450 pages
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Page 28 - A Circle is a plane figure bounded by a curved line every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 28 - A diameter of a circle is a straight line drawn through the centre, and terminated both ways by the circumference.
Page 326 - ... every muscle in his countenance was simultaneously thrown into fearful action ; rage, horror, despair, anguish, and ghastly smiles, united their hideous expression in the murderer's face, surpassing far the wildest representations of a Fuseli or a Kean. At this period several of the spectators were forced to leave the apartment from terror or sickness, and one gentleman fainted.
Page 167 - The marine barometer has not yet been in general use for many years, and the author of this work was one of a numerous crew who probably owed their preservation to its almost miraculous warning. It was in a southern latitude ; the sun had just set with placid appearance, closing a beautiful afternoon, and the usual mirth of the evening watch was proceeding, when the captain's order came to prepare with all haste for a storm. The barometer had began to fall with appalling rapidity.
Page 28 - A circle is a plane figure contained by one line, which is called the circumference, and is such, that all straight lines drawn from a certain point within the figure to the circumference are equal to one another : 16. And this point is called the centre of the circle.
Page 370 - Venus, a pea on a circle 284 feet in diameter ; the Earth also a pea, on a circle of 430 feet ; Mars, a rather large pin's head, on a circle of 654 feet ; Juno, Ceres, Vesta, and Pallas, grains of sand, in orbits of from 1000 to 1200 feet; Jupiter, a moderate-sized orange, in a circle nearly half a mile across...
Page 168 - In that awful night, but for the little tube of mercury which had given the warning, neither the strength of the noble ship, nor the skill and energies of the commander, could have saved one man to tell the tale.
Page 178 - J?xperiments.—In a vacuum, boiling commences at a much lower temperature than in the air. This is shown by placing some hot water under a receiver and exhausting the air. The pressure of the atmosphere being removed from its surface, the water soon boils; but it comes to rest the moment that air is readmitted. For the same reason, water boils at a lower temperature on the top of a mountain than at its base, as has often been observed by travellers. 442. If beer is placed under a receiver and the...
Page 88 - These simple machines are the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw. The lever.
Page 233 - ... the angle of reflection is always equal to the angle of incidence, the image for any point can be seen only in the reflected ray prolonged.

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