Carpentry and Building, Volume 23

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David Williams Company, 1901 - Architecture
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Page 192 - The Oriental types in their art lost their symbolic character, and became enriched and idealised by fancy : harmony and a sweet grace are in every line. The Etruscan is rude and Asiatic, with Greek luxuriance. It has leaves and frets, and circles. The Roman is strong and vigorous, leafy, luxurious, and voluptuous. — The Byzantine is barbarian, rich, knotted, linked, and studded like embroidery. It is vigorous, but conventional, sometimes grotesque and humorous, always varied, but full of strange...
Page 286 - The capital itself however was larger in proportion to the rest of the column, thereby affording a greater surface or impost for the arches to rest upon; and also combining the appearance of security at that point with general lightness of appearance. The shaft was mostly plain, yet frequently highly ornamental, striated or carved in different ways, and sometimes twisted, either singly or with two stems twining spirally around each other. Columns furnishing examples of all these different modes occur...
Page 286 - The wall or enclosure of the arena is supposed ic have been faced with marble more or less sumptuous; besides which, there appears to have been, in some instances at least, a sort of network affixed to the top of the podium, consisting of railing, or, rather, open trellis-work of metal. From the mention made of this network by ancient writers, little more can now be gathered respecting it than that, in the time of Nero, such netting, or whatever it might have been, was adorned with gilding and amber;...
Page 286 - ... seats, or chairs. This, as being by far the best situation for distinctly viewing the sports in the arena, and also more commodiously accessible than the seats higher up, was the place set apart for senators and other persons of distinction, such as the ambassadors of foreign states (Suet.
Page 286 - Pi-a, in which building the arches describe more than a semicircle above the capitals of the columns, being prolonged downwards by a deep abacus, consisting in some places of two, in others of a single plain block resting immediately on the capital; a mode certainly preferable to that of placing a mere lump of entablature upon the column, and not ungraceful in itself, because it gives greater height and importance to the arches, which, being narrow, would else appear stumpy, depressed, and overloaded...
Page 86 - The first order of business was the election of officers for the ensuing year, which resulted as follows: President.
Page 72 - Ascertain by the preceding rule the area of the lesser portion of the circle, subtract it from the area of the whole circle, and the remainder will give the area.
Page 72 - Multiply the number of degrees in the arc by the area of the whole circle and divide by 360. Example. What is the area of a sector of a circle whose radius is 5 and length of arc 60?
Page 50 - Resolved by the Senate (the House concurring), That a committee of three Senators be appointed to confer with a like committee to be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to arrange for a joint memorial service to be held in the hall of the House of Representatives, in memory of the late Ex-Governor Aaron T.
Page 286 - ... the column, and not ungraceful in itself, because it gives greater height and importance to the arches, which, being narrow, would else appear stumpy, depressed, and overloaded by the ornament around them.' Similar blocks or abaci occur in the remains of Frederick Barbarossa's palace at Gelnhausen, where small heads or masks are introduced immediately above such abaci, so as to fill up the space there between the arches, and continue in some degree the vertical lines produced by the columns....

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