The Teacher's Assistant: Or, a System of Practical Arithmetic: Wherein the Several Rules of that Useful Science are Illustrated by a Variety of Examples, a Large Proportion of which are in Federal Money. The Whole Designed to Abridge the Labour of Teachers, and to Facilitate the Instruction of Youth

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M. Polock, 1852 - Arithmetic - 192 pages
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Page 170 - When the two extremes and number of terms are given, to find the common difference. RULE. Divide the difference of the extremes by the number of terms, less one; the quotient will be the common difference.
Page 188 - Feet multiplied by feet, give feet. Feet multiplied by inches, give inches. Feet multiplied by seconds, give seconds. Inches multiplied by inches, give seconds. Inches multiplied by seconds, give thirds. Seconds multiplied by seconds, give fourths.
Page 134 - To reduce any given quantity to the fraction of any greater denomination of the same kind. RULE. Reduce the given quantity to the lowest term mentioned for a numerator; then reduce the integral part to the same term, for.
Page 72 - Then multiply the second and third terms together, and divide the product by the first term: the quotient will be the fourth term, or answer.
Page 155 - Subtract the square number from the left hand period, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a dividend.
Page 129 - Operations with Fractions A) To change a mixed number to an improper fraction, simply multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fraction and add the numerator.
Page 29 - Scale: 4 farthings (far.) = 1 penny (d.); 12 pence = 1 shilling (s.) ; 20 shillings — 1 pound (). 156.
Page 155 - RULE. 1. Separate the given number into periods of two figures, each, beginning at the units place.
Page 127 - The number above the line is called the numerator, and that below the line the denominator. The denominator...
Page 15 - DIVISION we find how many times one number is contained in another. The number to be divided, is called the DIVIDEND ; the number by which to divide is called the DIVISOR; the number of times the dividend contains the divisor is called the QUOTIENT.

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