College Entrance Examination Papers in Plane Geometry

Front Cover
Charles E. Merrill Company, 1911 - Geometry, Plane - 178 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 96 - The areas of two triangles which have an angle of the one equal to an angle of the other are to each other as the products of the sides including the equal angles.
Page 52 - ... meeting the plane at unequal distances from the foot of the perpendicular the more remote is the greater.
Page 84 - Two triangles which have an angle of one equal to the supplement of an angle of the other are to each other as the products of the sides including the supplementary angles.
Page 16 - In any triangle, the square of the side opposite an acute angle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides diminished by twice the product of one of those sides and the projection of the other upon that side.
Page 95 - The straight line joining the middle points of two sides of a triangle is parallel to the third side, and equal to half of it.
Page 17 - In any obtuse triangle, the square of the side opposite the obtuse angle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, increased by twice the product of one of these sides and the projection of the other side upon it.
Page 59 - Construct a circle having its center in a given line and passing through two given points. 3. The bisector of the angle of a triangle divides the opposite side into segments which are proportional to the two other sides.
Page 172 - Guido, with a burnt stick in his hand, demonstrating on the smooth paving-stones of the path, that the square on the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares on the other two sides.
Page 135 - If two triangles have two sides of one equal respectively to two sides of the other, but the included angle of the first greater than the included angle of the second, then the third side of the first is greater than the third side of the second.
Page 60 - The area of a circle is equal to one-half the product of its circumference and radius.

Bibliographic information