Principles of physiology, general and comparative

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Blanchard and Lea, 1851 - 1098 pages
 

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Page 75 - I have now before me," he says, " three plants of Raspberries, which have been raised in the gardens of the Horticultural Society, from seeds taken from the stomach of a man whose skeleton was found thirty feet below the surface of the earth, at the bottom of a burrow which was opened near Dorchester.
Page 53 - He states that the cases of disease on the dark side of an extensive barrack at St. Petersburg have been uniformly for many years in the proportion of three to one to those on the side exposed to strong light.
Page 594 - I discovered in it the definite statement that — "there is a certain degree of antagonism between the Nutritive and Reproductive functions, the one being executed at the expense of the other. The reproductive apparatus derives the materials of its operations through the nutritive system, and is entirely dependent upon it for the continuance of its function. If, therefore, it be in a state of excessive activity, it will necessarily draw off from the individual fabric some portion of the aliment...
Page 565 - ANALOGUE." — A part or organ in one animal which has the same function as another part or organ in a different animal. " HOMOLOGUE." — The same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function f.
Page 41 - And there is a blue Water-Lily, abounding in several of the canals at Alexandria, which at certain seasons become so dry, that their beds are burnt as hard as bricks by the action of the sun, so as to be fit for use as carriage roads ; yet the plants do not thereby lose their vitality ; for when the water is again admitted, they resume their growth with redoubled vigour.
Page 651 - ... are employed, the direction varies much more, according to the nature of the liquids employed. This variation appears to have some relation to the physiological conditions in which these membranes are placed in the living animal : thus, the direction most favourable to Endosmose between water and a saccharine solution, is not the same for the stomach of a ruminant as for that of a carnivorous animal : as yet however no positive statement can be made on this subject. When membranes are employed...
Page 66 - Blanca, which is four degrees southward, and therefore with a climate only a very little colder, this same temperature with a rather less extreme heat, was sufficient to awake all orders of animated beings.
Page 75 - raised in the garden of the Horticultural Society from seeds taken from the stomach of a man, whose skeleton was found thirty feet below the surface of the earth, at the bottom of a barrow which was opened near Dorchester. He had been buried with some coins of the Emperor Hadrian ; and it is therefore probable that the seeds were sixteen or seventeen hundred years old...
Page 651 - ... a strong tendency to mutual diffusion, and the difference in attractive power which the septum has for them respectively is not great, each may find its way < towards the other, and a considerable exosmose may ensue, with very little change of level. The amount of the exosmotic as of the endosmotic current, varies with the direction in which it traverses the membrane ; thus, when sugar, albumen, or gum, was employed in solution, its transudation towards water took place most readily from the...
Page 652 - The vascularity of the tissues, and the rate of movement of the blood through the vessels. And the results of experiments upon recently-dead membranes which retain almost exactly the same physical conditions as those which they possessed during life, but have entirely lost their vital properties, seem most decidedly to indicate that the relative facility with which different substances are absorbed, and the direction most favourable to their...

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