Cyclopedia of Architecture, Carpentry and Building: Building superintendence. Contracts and specifications (Parts I and II). Building law

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American Technical Society, 1909 - Architecture
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Page 320 - A valuable consideration in the sense of the law may consist either in some right, interest, profit, or benefit accruing to the one party, or some forbearance, detriment, loss, or responsibility given, suffered, or undertaken by the other.
Page 364 - AGREEMENT, made the day of in the year one thousand, nine hundred and by and between party of the first part (hereinafter designated the Contractor..), and party of the second part (hereinafter designated the Owner..), WITNESSETH that the Contractor.., in consideration of the agreements herein made by the Owner.., agree., with the said Owner., as follows: ARTICLE I. The Contractor., shall and will provide all the materials and perform all the work for the...
Page 320 - A valuable consideration in the sense of the law is said to consist either in some right, interest, profit or benefit accruing to one party, or some forbearance, detriment, loss, or responsibility given, suffered or undertaken by the other.
Page 139 - Lay all stones which consist of layers in such a manner that the principal pressure which they have to bear shall act in a direction perpendicular, or as nearly so as possible, to the direction of the layers. This is called laying the stone on its natural bed, and is of primary importance for strength and durability.
Page 113 - Mortar is sometimes made so thin that the brick will not absorb all the water. This practice is objectionable; it interferes with the setting of the mortar, and particularly with the adhesion of the mortar to the brick. Watery mortar also contracts excessively in drying (if it ever does dry), which causes undue settlement and, possibly, cracks or distortion. .The bricks should not be wetted to the point of saturation, or they will be incapable of absorbing any of the moisture from the mortar, and...
Page 364 - II. It Is understood and agreed by and between the parties hereto that the work Included In this contract is to be done under the direction of the said Architect, and that his decision as to the true construction and meaning of the drawings and specifications shall be final.
Page 364 - It is understood and agreed by and between the parties hereto that the work included in this contract is to be done under the direction of the said architect — , and that decision as to the true construction and meaning of the drawings and specifications shall be final.
Page 364 - Should the Contractor at any time refuse or neglect to supply a sufficiency of properly skilled workmen, or of materials of the proper quality, or fail in any respect to prosecute the work with promptness and diligence, or fail in the performance of any of the agreements herein contained, such refusal, neglect or failure being certified by the Architect, the Owner shall be at liberty, after three days...
Page 114 - ... (bats, sand, and rubbish are often substituted for bricks), allowing them to find their own bearing; when the trough is filled it is plastered over with stiff mortar and the header course laid and the operation repeated This practice may have some advantage in celerity in executing work, but none in strength or security.

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