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A

TREATISE

ON

ARITHMETIC,

COMBINING

ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS,

ADAPTED TO

THE BEST MODE OF INSTRUCTION IN COMMON SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES.

BY

JAMES S. EATON, M. A.,

INSTRUCTOR IN PHILLIPS ACADEMY, ANDOVER, AND PRESIDENT OF THE ESSEX COUNTY TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.

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MARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

FROM THE ESTATE OF
EDWIN HALE ABBOT

DECEMBER 28, 1931

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1857, by

JAMES S. EATON,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

Stereotyped by

W. F. DRAPER, ANDOVER.

PREFACE.

In an experience of many years in teaching Arithmetic, the author of the following treatise has thought that, with many excellencies, there were also many defects in the best books in use. To correct these defects and to multiply the excellencies has been his constant aim. This is his only apology for presenting another school-book in a department already overburdened.

It has been the guiding principle to be clear, brief, accurate, logical. Subjects are arranged, first, with reference to their dependence, and, secondly, with reference to their importance and simplicity the less difficult and more practical first, and the more intricate and less important afterwards.

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In Reduction, those examples requiring a familiar acquaintance with fractions have been deferred until fractions have been discussed; and in Fractions, the several operations have been arranged with strict regard to the dependence of principles, contrary to the almost uniform arrangement of other works.

Some articles of a practical business nature, not usually found in arithmetics, have been introduced, and special care has been taken to adapt the work to the wants of the business community; yet the science of numbers has not been forgotten, but the definitions and manner of discussion have been designed to prepare the pupil to enter upon the study of Algebra with pleasure and profit.

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