Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" O will be equal to sixty degrees. Hence, if any two angles of a triangle be known, the third may be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180 degrees, the remainder will be the number of degrees in the third angle. "
An Elementary Treatise on Plane & Spherical Trigonometry: With Their ... - Page 40
by Benjamin Peirce - 1845 - 449 pages
Full view - About this book

Celestial Scenery: Or, The Wonders of the Planetary System Displayed ...

Thomas Dick - Astronomy - 1838 - 444 pages
...O will be equal to sixty degrees. Hence, if any two angles of a triangle be known, the third may be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180 degrees, the remainder will be the number of degrees in the third angle. All the triangles have their...
Full view - About this book

Celestial Scenery: Or, The Wonders of the Planetary System Displayed

Thomas Dick - Astronomy - 1838 - 426 pages
...O will be equal to sixty degrees. Hence, if any two angles of a triangle be known, the third may be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180 degrees, the remainder will be the number of degrees in the third angle. AH the triangles have their...
Full view - About this book

A Treatise on Geometry and Its Application in the Arts

Dionysius Lardner - Curves, Plane - 1840 - 386 pages
...other two, it must be acute. (56.) If two angles of a triangle be known, the remaining angle may be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180°. (57.) If two triangles have two angles in the one equal to two angles in the other, the remaining angles...
Full view - About this book

An Elementary Treatise on Plane & Spherical Trigonometry: With Their ...

Benjamin Peirce - Plane trigonometry - 1845 - 498 pages
...В ; whence sin. В = -.— — . (134) Secondly. The third angle is found by subtracting the sura of the two known angles from 180°. Thirdly. The third...proportion. As the sine of the given angle is to the sine of the angle opposite the required side, so is the side opposite the given angle to the required side....
Full view - About this book

Mathematical Dictionary and Cyclopedia of Mathematical Science: Comprising ...

Charles Davies, William Guy Peck - Electronic book - 1855 - 592 pages
...cases may arise in solving oblique triangles : 1. When two angles and a side are trinen. In this case, the third angle is found by subtracting the sum of the two given angles from 180°. The sides may then be found by for- ˇ ínula (1). 2 When tico sides and an...
Full view - About this book

Hints to travellers

Royal geographical society - 1883
...For the rest we have : — . A TABLE I. In oblique-angled triangles, if two of the angles are known, the third angle is found by subtracting the sum of the two from 180°; for the rest we have : — Case. Given. Required. Solution. ' i Hyp. AC Angles . . BaseCB.....
Full view - About this book

Elementary Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical

Edwin Pliny Seaver - Trigonometry - 1889 - 306 pages
...one side and two angles of a triangle to find the other parts. Let Ъ, A, and Б be the given parts. The third angle is found by subtracting the sum of the two given angles from 180°. С = 180° — (A + Б). To find the side c, draw a perpendicular С R to...
Full view - About this book

Physiography for Advanced Students

Arthur Thomas Simmons - Geomorphology - 1897 - 516 pages
...are known, the third or B FIG. 198.— An instrument to illustrate Parallax. remaining angle can be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180°. In the preceding experiments two angles (A and B) of a triangle were measured in the case of each object...
Full view - About this book

The Draftsman, Volumes 3-4

Mechanical drawing - 1904
...explanation. By the use of this principle, when two angles are known, the value of the third can readily be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180. Now for a practical problem : A bevel gear io pitch dia. 2 diametral pitch meshes with another gear...
Full view - About this book

Astronomy for the Man in the Street, on Our Solar and Planetary System

E. A. Selley - Astronomy - 1907 - 456 pages
...degrees in the known angle from 90. Hence, if any two angles of a triangle are known, the third may be found by subtracting the sum of the two known angles from 180°, the remainder being the number of degrees in the third angle. However, this is more of the mathematical...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF