The Architects' and Builders' Handbook: Data for Architects, Structural Engineers, Contractors, and Draughtsmen

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 1921 - Architecture - 1907 pages
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Contents

at I
26
xiv
124
UNIT LOADS ON FOUNDATIONBEDS ALLOWED BY BUILDING opes 10 INVESTIGATION OF THE SITE
142
LOADINGTESTS
145
TOPOGRAPHICAL AND SPECIAL CONDITIONS
146
LOADS COMING ON THE FOOTINGS
148
ASSUMED Loads SPECIFIED BY BUILDING COPES
151
PROPORTIONING SUPPORTING AREAS FOR EQUAL SETTLEMENT
152
PROPORTIONING SUPPORTING AREAS FOR EQUAL SETTLEMENT 16 DETERMINING THE SUPPORTING AREAS 17 OFFSET FOOTINGS
160
THE USE OF CANTILEVERS IN FOUNDATIONS
165
STRESSES IN FOOTING COURSES
169
METHODS OF CALCULATING BENDINGSTRESSES IN WALLFOOTINGS
172
BENDING MOMENTS IN FOOTINGS OF COLUMNS AND PIERS
176
DESIGN OF THE FOOTINGS
178
STEEL GRILLAGE IN FOUNDATIONS 24 REINFORCED CONCRETE FOOTINGS 25 TYBER FOOTINGS FOR TEMPORARY BUILDINGS
186
GENERAL CONDITIONS AFFECTING FOUNDATIONS AND FOOTINGS 27 WOODENPILE FOUNDATIONS
188
CONCRETEPILE FOUNDATIONS
196
FOUNDATION PIERS AND FOUNDATION WALLS 30 METHODS OF EXCAVATING FOR FOUNDATIONS 31 PROTECTION OF ADJOINING...
200
1
204
PROTECTION OF ADJOINING STRUCTURES
214
CHAPTER III
223
WALLS OF THE SUPERSTRUCTURE
233
NATURAL CEMENTS
238
ARTIFICIAL CEMENTS 6 CONCRETE 223 228 229 235 236
241
CHAPTER IV
252
RETAININGWALLS 3 BREASTWALLS 4 VAULTWALLS
254
ARTIFICIAL CEMENTS 6 CONCRETE BY PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURAL CONSTRUCTION UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTE...
265
255
279
GRENVILLE TEMPLE SNELLING LATE MEMBER OF AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
297
Contents
300
CHAPTER XV
318
CHAPTER IX
322
REACTIONS FOR BEAMS
323
BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS 3 BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS FOR DIFFERENT KINDS OF LOADING
325
GRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS 5 REACTIONS AND BENDING MOMENTS FOR BEAMS WITH ...
331
CHAPTER X
332
AREAS MOMENTS OF INERTIA SECTIONMODULI AND RADII OF GYRATION OF ELEMENTARY SECTIONS
334
TRANSFERRING MOMENTS OF INERTIA TO OTHER PARALLEL AXES
338
MOMENTS OF INERTIA OF COMPOUND SECTIONS
339
RADII OF GYRATION OF COMPOUND SECTIONS
344
GRAPHICAL METHOD OF DETERMINING THE MOMENT OF INERTIA OF PLANE FIGURES
345
DIMENSIONS MOMENTS OF INERTIA RADII OF GYRATION AND SECTIONMODULI OF STANDARD STRUCTURAL SHAPES
352
PAGE
355
229
357
331
358
1
359
223
360
CHAPTER XI
375
WROUGHT IRON
378
STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL FOR BUILDINGS
383
WIRE
404
262
409
CHAPTER XXII
454
CAST IRON
457
I
458
235
462
263
465
PAGE
469
132
483
134
498
135
507
200
509
214
510
140
512
334
514
145
518
146
520
148
521
338
523
344
527
345
528
352
536
151
546
STEEL BEAMS AND GIRDERS
564
TABLES OF SAFE LOADS FOR STEEL BEAMS AND GIRDERS EXAMPLES
570
163
585
165
594
169
605
FRAMING AND CONNECTING STEEL BEAMS AND GIRDERS
612
CHAPTER XVI
620
172
627
FLEXURAL STRENGTH OF WOODEN BEAMS
629
FLEXURAL STRENGTH OF BEAMS
633
APPLICATION OF FORMULAS FOR FLEXURAL STRENGTHS OF WOODEN BEAMS
635
178
646
WORKING UNIT STRESSES FOR WOODS
647
FLITCHED BEAMS OR FLITCHPLATE GIRDERS
655
FLITCHED BEAMS OR FLITCHPLATE GIRDERS 655 2
659
181
734
188
735
ARCHITECTS
750
WOODEN MILL AND WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION A P STRADLING
758
STANDARD MILLCONSTRUCTION
760
BELTS STAIRWAYS AND ELEVATORTOWERS 6 STANDARD STOREHOUSECONSTRUCTION
764
MILLCONSTRUCTION
769
SAWTOOTH ROOFCONSTRUCTION
772
WHAT MILLCONSTRUCTION IS 3 WHAT MILLCONSTRUCTION IS NOT 4 STANDARD MILLCONSTRUCTION
776
DOORS AND SHUTTERS 20 FIREPROTECTION 5 BELTS STAIRWAYS AND ELEVATORTOWERS 6 STANDARD STOREHOUSECONSTRUC...
777
STEEL AND IRON STRUCTURAL MEMBERS IN WAREHOUSECONSTRUCTION
780
STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF MILLCONSTRUCTION AS APPLIED TO FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES
782
CONNECTION OF FLOORBEAMS AND GIRDERS
789
CONNECTION OF FLOORBEAMS AND GIRDERS 13 WALL SUPPORTS AND ANCHORS FOR JOISTS AND GIRDERS
792
WEAKNESS OF WROUGHTIRON STIRRUPS WHEN EXPOSED TO FIRE 15 POST AND GIRDERCONNECTIONS 16 FORM AND MATERIAL ...
794
ROOFINGMATERIALS 18 PARTITIONS
800
COST OF MILLS AND FACTORIES BUILT ON THE SLOWBURNING PRINCIPLE
802
200
856
FIREPROOF ROOFCONSTRUCTION
866
PARTITIONS AND WALLCOVERINGS
877
FIREPROOF FLOORING
892
INTERIOR FINISH AND FITTINGS
895
PROTECTION FROM OUTSIDE HAZARD
901
EXTINGUISHING DEVICES AND PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES PAGE
903
RUDOLPH P MILLER SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN NEW YORK CITY
906
4
946
DEFINITIONS AREAS HEIGHTS AND COSTS 2 FIRERESISTANCE OF MATERIALS 3 COLUMNPROTECTION
958
1
974
EXAMPLES SHOWING USE OF TABLES IN STRESSCOMPUTATIONS
1065
2
1072
DETERMINATION OF STRESSES IN ROOFTRUSSES BY GRAPHIC METHODS
1075
DETERMINATION OF WINDLOAD STRESSES
1109
TRUSSES WITH KNEEBRACES
1117
ARCHED TRUSSES
1118
TRUSSED ARCHES
1121
ARCHES WITH SOLID RIBS
1132
INFLUENCELINES FOR SIMPLE BEAMS AND TRUSSES
1134
SECONDARY STRESSES IN TRUSSMEMBERS
1136
CHAPTER XXVIII
1138
DESIGN OF WOODEN TRUSSES
1143
DESIGN OF STEEL TRUSSES
1145
JOINTS OF WOODEN TRUSSES
1154
JOINTS OF STEEL TRUSSES
1160
PURLINS AND PURLINCONNECTIONS
1168
CHAPTER XXIX
1170
CONDITIONS DETERMINING OR AFFECTING WINDBRACING
1172
GENERAL THEORY OF WINDBRACING 4 ARRANGEMENT OF WINDBRACING 5 TYPES OF WINDBRACING
1174
COMPUTATION OF WINDSTRESSES
1176
ILLUSTRATION OF METHOD OF COMPUTING WINDSTRESSES
1177
ANALYSIS OF STRESSES IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF WINDBRACING
1179
COMBINATION OF DEAD AND LIVE LOADS WITH WINDLOAD
1183
WINDBRACING OF WATERTOWERS AND SIMILAR STRUCTURES
1184
RECENT EXAMPLES OF WINDBRACING IN TALL BUILDINGS
1186
CHAPTER XXX
1194
STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL FOR BUILDINGS
1195
PAGE
1198
1138
1199
TENSIONMEMBERS
1201
MECHANICAL PRINCIPLES INVOLVED 2 RETAININGWALLS 3 BREASTWALLS 4 VAULTWALLS 252
1208
732
1210
V
1214
LOUIS A HARDING
1246
746
1248
PROPERTI
1261
FUELS
1270
1065
1272
FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE
1275
STEAMHE
1280
THE DESIG
1290
1116
1304
262
1338
DRAFT AND DRAFTLOSS
1368
SELFSUSTAINING STEEL CHIMNEYS
1376
263
1385
PRIVATE WATERSUPPLY PUMPS
1390
HYDRAULICS PLUMBING AND DRAINAGE
1396
FIRESTREAMS
1397
620
1405
627
1418
TESTING OF PLUMBING SYSTEMS
1420
ILLUMINATINGGAS
1431
W H TIMBIE
1437
STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR GASPIPING PLANS
1445
EXAMPLES OF DESIGN OF A LIGHTING SYSTEM
1451
WIRE
1454
629
1515
GENERAL
1529
633
1561
MATERIAL
1566
3
1586
CHAINS
1649
375
1674
KE 5
1719
LOADS
1826
AMERICAN BRIDGE COMPANY NEW YORK N
1857
1132
1858
749
1859
635
1860
PROTECTION FROM OUTSIDE HAZARD 10 EXTINGUISHING DEVICES AND PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES 811
1863
1708
1868
801
1873
750
1874
1137
1877
756
1878
1437
1882
377
1884
802
1885
1138
1888
1727
1889
1144
1890
811
1891
1160
1894
814
1896
1171
1897
379
1898
406
1899
1172
1900
873
1901
201
1902
GENERAL 2 MATERIAL 3 LOADS ROBINS FLEMING OF
1906
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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - Multiply the divisor, thus augmented, by the last figure of the root, and subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend.
Page 64 - To three times the square of the radius of its base add the square of its height; multiply this sum by the height and the product by 0.5236.
Page 38 - A circle is a closed plane curve, all points of which are equidistant from a point within called the center.
Page 246 - The question of the conductivity of concrete is one which requires further study and investigation before a definite rate for different classes of concrete can be fully established. However, for ordinary conditions it is recommended that the metal in girders and columns be protected by a minimum of 2 in.
Page 237 - The cement shall be stored in such a manner as to permit easy access for proper inspection and identification of each shipment. 5. Every facility shall be provided by the contractor and a period of at least twelve days allowed for the inspection and necessary tests.
Page 63 - To find the solidity, or volume, of a cylinder. RULE. — Multiply the area of the base by the altitude, and the product will be the solidity or volume.
Page 36 - Polygons A POLYGON is a portion of a plane bounded by straight lines. A TRIANGLE is a polygon of three sides. A...
Page 39 - To find the area of a trapezoid. RULE. Multiply half the sum of the two parallel sides "by the perpendicular distance between them : the product will be the area.
Page 383 - Rivet steel, and steel for plates or angles over % in. in thickness which are to be punched, shall be made by the open-hearth process. II. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES AND TESTS Chemical Composition 2.
Page 41 - To find the diameter of a circle when the circumference is given. Rule. Divide the circumference by 3.1416, or for a very close approximate result, multiply by 7 and divide by 22.

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