Elements of Precise Surveying and Geodesy

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J. Wiley & sons, 1899 - Geodesy - 261 pages
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Page 151 - The sum of the angles of a spherical triangle is greater than two and less than six right angles ; that is, greater than 180 and less than 540. (gr). If A'B'C' is the polar triangle of ABC...
Page 15 - Assume that the weights for the following subjects are: English 3, History 2, Mathematics 2, Foreign Languages 2, and Art 1. What would be the average of a student whose marks are: English 80, History 85, Algebra 84, Spanish 82, and Art 90? Solution...
Page 156 - The figure of the earth is very nearly that of an oblate spheroid, that is, an ellipsoid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about its minor axis. The...
Page 15 - In observations of equal precision the most probable values of the observed quantities are those that render the sum of the squares of the residual errors a minimum ; and in...
Page 156 - CHAPTER VII. . SPHEROIDAL GEODESY. 57. PROPERTIES OF THE ELLIPSE. Since an oblate spheroid is generated by the revolution of •an ellipse about its minor axis, the equator and all the sections of the spheroid parallel to the equator are circles, and all sections made by planes passing through the axis of revolution are equal ellipses. Let a and b represent the lengths of the semi-major and semi-minor axes of this meridian ellipse, which are the same as the semi-equatorial and semi-polar diameters...
Page 242 - THE word Geoid is used to designate the actual figure of the surface of the waters of the earth. The sphere, the spheroid, the ellipsoid, the ovaloid, and many other geometrical figures may be, to a less or greater degree, sufficient practical approximations to the geoidal or earthlike shape, yet no such assumed form can be found to represent it with precision. The geoid, then, is an irregular figure peculiar to our planet...
Page 141 - Astronomeres, in 12 Signes; and every Signe is devysed in 30 Degrees, that is 360 Degrees, that the Firmament hathe aboven. Also, be the Erthe devysed in als many parties, as the Firmament; and lat every partye answere to a Degree of the Firmament: and wytethe it wel, that aftre the...
Page 40 - ... right. The order in which the characters were to be read, was shown by the direction in which the figures are placed, as their heads are invariably turned towards the reader. A single line of hieroglyphics—the dedication of a temple or of any other monument, for example—proceeds sometimes one half from left to right, and the other half from right to left; but in this case a sign, such as the sacred tau, or an obelisk, which has no particular direction, is placed in the middle of the inscription,...
Page 140 - Sterre, ne apperethe not to hem. For whiche cause, men may wel perceyve, that the Lond and the See ben of rownde schapp and forme. For the partie of the Firmament schewethe in o Contree, that schewethe not in another Contree.

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