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" Principles Of Human Knowledge 1. OBJECTS OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE.—It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either IDEAS actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are perceived by attending to the... "
Five Years in an English University - Page 445
by Charles Astor Bristed - 1852
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Monthly Magazine; Or, British Register of Literature, Sciences ..., Volume 14

Art - 1803 - 688 pages
...and accompanying each with critical animadverfion. I. It is evident (o any one, who takes a furvey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the fenles, or elfe fuch as are perceived by attending to the pallions and operations of the mind, or,...
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Metaphysical Essays: Containing the Principles and Fundamental Objects of ...

Richard Kirwan - First philosophy - 1809 - 542 pages
...fenfes ; J and that this author having laid down, that it muft be evident to any one that takes a furvey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprefled on the fenfes, or elfe fuch as are, perceived by attending to the paffions and operations...
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Philosophical Essays

Dugald Stewart - Philosophy - 1811 - 590 pages
...WE are percipient of nothing" (says Bishop Berkeley) " but of bur own perceptions and ideas." — " It is evident " to any one who takes a survey of the..." on the senses,* or else such as are perceived by attend" ing to the passions and operations of the mind,f or " lastly, ideas formed by help of memory...
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The Intellectual repository for the New Church. (July/Sept. 1817 ...

New Church gen. confer - 1875 - 618 pages
...Johnson " finds there is no room for his pompous phrases — the field is the Bishop of Cloyne's. " It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of his knowledge,'" says he, " that these objects are either ideas actually (1) imprinted on the senses;...
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Philosophical Essays

Dugald Stewart - Philosophy - 1816 - 644 pages
...nearly in his own words : " We arc percipient of nothing but our own perceptions and " ideas." — " It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the " objects of human knowledge, that they are cither ideas actually " imprinted on the senses ; or else such as are perceived by at" tending to the...
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A Search of Truth in the Science of the Human Mind, Part First, Volume 1

Frederick Beasley - Philosophy - 1822 - 584 pages
...also, all the objects of our knowledge in reference to the internal world, consist of those ideas which are perceived, by attending to the passions and operations of the mind, of consequence, the internal world or mind, as far as substance or any distinct subsistence is concerned,...
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The British Critic, Volume 23

English literature - 1825 - 666 pages
...percipient of nothing," said the former, " but of our own perceptions and ideas." "It is evident," he adds, "to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human...that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the * See Introduction to his Inquiry into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense. senses, or...
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The Guardian: With a Biographical, Historical, and Critical ..., Volume 1

1826 - 434 pages
...which do not seem much different from the former), he affirms that the objects of human knowledge " are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses,...operations of the mind, or, lastly, ideas formed by the help of memory and imagination, either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally...
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Philosophical essays

Dugald Stewart - 1829 - 450 pages
...WE are percipient of nothing," says Bishop Berkeley, " but of our own perceptions and ideas." — " It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the...by attending to the passions and operations of the mind,f or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination, either compounding, dividing, or...
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Philosophical essays

Dugald Stewart - 1829 - 454 pages
...stated nearly in his own words. " We are percipient of nothing but our own perceptions and ideas."—" It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of human knowledge, that they are cither ideas actually imprinted on the senses; or else such as are perceived by attending to the passions...
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