Michael Faraday

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Macmillan and Company, 1872 - 176 pages

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Page 13 - THE ROMAN AND THE TEUTON. A Series of Lectures delivered before the University of Cambridge.
Page 42 - French language, and prepared the way for Corneille and for Racine. The present work aims to afford information and direction touching the early efforts of France in poetical literature. " In one moderately sized volume he has contrived to introduce us to the very best, if not to all of the early French poets.
Page 7 - The book indeed is full of instruction and interest to students of all ages, and he must be a well-informed man indeed who will not rise from its perusal with clearer and more accurate ideas of a too much neglected portion of English History.
Page 25 - Wilson. — A MEMOIR OF GEORGE WILSON, MD, FRSE, Regius Professor of Technology in the University of Edinburgh. By his SISTER. New Edition. Crown 8vo. 6s. "An exquisite and touching portrait of a rare and beautiful spirit.
Page 9 - out of the great poems themselves, have these Divinities looked so majestic and respectable. To read these brilliant details is like standing on the Olympian threshold and gazing at the ineffable brightness within.
Page 43 - PEILE (JOHN, MA)— AN INTRODUCTION TO GREEK AND LATIN ETYMOLOGY. By JOHN PEILE, MA, Fellow and Tutor of Christ's College, Cambridge, formerly Teacher of Sanskrit in the University of Cambridge. Third and Revised Edition. Crown 8vo.
Page 39 - Stephen attempts to show what are the real wants met by Sisterhoods, to what extent the same wants may be effectually met by the organization of corresponding institutions on a secular basis, and what are the reasons for endeavouring to do so.
Page 4 - British empire, a public institution for diffusing the knowledge and facilitating the general introduction of useful mechanical inventions and improvements, and for teaching, by courses of philosophical lectures and experiments, the application of science to the common purposes of life.
Page 9 - Galileo. — THE PRIVATE LIFE OF GALILEO, compiled principally from his Correspondence and that of his eldest daughter, Sister Maria Celeste, Nun in the Franciscan Convent of S. Matthew in Arcetri. With Portrait. Crown 8vo.
Page 93 - The philosopher should be a man willing to listen to every suggestion, but determined to judge for himself. He should not be biased by appearances, have no favorite hypothesis, be of no school, and in doctrine have no master. He should not be a respecter of persons, but of things. Truth should be his primary object. If to these qualities be added industry, he may indeed hope to walk within the veil of the temple of Nature.

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