The Principles of Logic: For High Schools and Colleges

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Wilson, Hinkle & Company, 1859 - Logic - 168 pages
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Page 145 - it will argue nothing against the trustworthiness of consciousness that all, or any of its deliverances, are inexplicable, are incomprehensible; that is, that we are unable to conceive through a higher notion how that is possible, which the deliverance avouches actually to be. To make the comprehensibility of a datum of consciousness the criterion of its truth would be, indeed, the climax of absurdity.
Page 115 - Whatever be the most proper mode of expressing it, the proposition that the course of nature is uniform is the fundamental principle, or general axiom, of Induction.
Page 46 - In this case, the concept, responsible agent, is contained under the concept, free agent; that is, the class of responsible agents is a species of which the class of free agents is the genus. The concept, man, is contained under the concept, responsible agent ; that is, the class, man, is a species of which the class of responsible agents is the genus. Hence, on the principle, that a part of a part is a part of the whole, the concept, man, is contained under the concept free ag'ent.
Page 115 - ... the proposition that the course of nature is uniform is the fundamental principle or general axiom of induction. It would yet be a great error to offer this large generalization as any explanation of the inductive process. On the contrary, I hold it to be itself an instance of induction, and induction by no means of the most obvious kind. Far from being the first induction we make, it is one of the last or, at all events, one of those which are latest in attaining strict philosophical accuracy.
Page 148 - It must be granted that in every syllogism, considered as an argument to prove the conclusion, there is a petitio principii. When we say, All men are mortal, Socrates is a man, therefore Socrates is mortal; it is unanswerably urged by the adversaries of the syllogistic theory, that the proposition, Socrates is mortal...
Page 149 - All men are mortal: that the general principle, instead of being given as evidence of the particular case cannot itself be taken for true without exception, until every shadow of doubt which could affect any case comprised with it, is dispelled by evidence aliunde; and then what remains for the syllogism to prove?
Page 159 - God causes the movements of the body to correspond with the volitions of the mind. 12. Euathlus, a young man, agreed to pay Protagoras, the prince of sophists, a large sum of money to accomplish him as a legal rhetorician. One half the sum was paid down, and it was agreed that the other half should be paid on the day when Euathlus should plead and gain his first case. But as the scholar was not in so much of a hurry to commence his legal practice as the master to obtain the other half of his fee,...
Page 119 - Polygons are classified according to the number of sides. A triangle is a polygon of three sides. A quadrilateral is a polygon of four sides. A pentagon is a polygon of five sides. A hexagon is a polygon of six sides.
Page 148 - ; that the general principle, instead of being given as evidence of the particular case, cannot itself be taken for true without exception, until every shadow of doubt which could affect any case comprised with it is dispelled by evidence...
Page 149 - Any term of an Arithmetical Progression is equal to the first term plus the number of the term minus one into the common difference, by examining all of the cases involved?

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