The Elements of Plane and Solid Geometry ...

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D. Van Nostrand Company, 1890 - Geometry - 393 pages
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Page 72 - A circle is a plane figure bounded by a curved line, called the circumference, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 186 - Two triangles having an angle of the one equal to an angle of the other are to each other as the products of the sides including the equal angles.
Page 45 - If two triangles have two sides of the one equal respectively to two sides of the other, but the included angle of the first greater than the included angle of the second, then the third side of the first is greater than the third side of the second. Hyp. In A ABC and A'B'C' AB = A'B'; AC = A'C'; ZA>ZA'.
Page 12 - AXIOMS. 1. Things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other. 2. If equals be added to equals, the sums will be equal.
Page 334 - A sphere is a solid bounded by a curved surface, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 253 - Equal oblique lines from a point to a plane meet the plane at equal distances from the foot of the perpendicular ; and of two unequal oblique lines the greater meets the plane at the greater distance from the foot of the perpendicular.
Page 378 - The circumferences of the sections made by the planes are called the bases of the zone, and the distance between the planes is the altitude of the zone.
Page 354 - A zone is a portion of the surface of a sphere included between two parallel planes. The circumferences of the sections...
Page 29 - If a straight line meet two straight lines, so as to make the two interior angles on the same side of it taken together less than two right angles...
Page 220 - The areas of two circles are to each other as the squares of their radii. For, if S and S' denote the areas, and R and R

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