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IN

PLANE GEOMETRY

WITH

METRIC AND LOGARITHMIC TABLES

BY

J. G. ESTILL

OF THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL, LAKEVILLE, CONN.

NEW YORK

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

LONDON AND BOMBAY

1903

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ed as are almost universally

because they are not found

tion, will be gratefully re

J. G. ESTILL.

PREFATORY NOT

WHEN arithmetic was dropped from the requirements for admission to Yale College, in 1894, the following substitute was adopted: "Plane Geometry (b)-Solution of numerical problems involving the metric system and the use of Logarithms, also as much of the theory of Logarithms as is necessary to explain their use in simple arithmetical operations.-Five-figure tables will be used in the examination." (1896-97 Catalogue.)

At the conference on uniform requirements for admission to college, in February, 1896, at Columbia College, representing Harvard, Yale, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, and Cornell, and nearly all the large preparatory schools of the East, the Mathematical Conference voted unanimously to recommend that arithmetic be dropped from the college entrance requirements, and that a knowledge of the metric system and the ability to solve numerical problems in Plane Geometry be required.

These two facts account for the writing of this little book.

The most of the problems have had class-room test. They add interest to the study of formal geometry. They are helpful, too, in making clear, and fastening in the memory, the principles and propositions of formal geometry. They enforce the practical application of truths

RY NOTE.

have no application. They s valuable to those who are not or those who are. These prob

MAND Clace of other geometries, but are G And, therefore, the division into GRADUATE Espond pretty closely with that of the general use.

use of the metric system is begun at the very first, simple as that necessarily makes the problems of the first book, for the most part. No other book contains a graded set of problems on the first two books of geometry.

No apology is considered necessary for putting in quite a number of problems which presuppose some knowledge of algebra.

The order of the problems is not the same as the order of the propositions of any geometry; neither are all the problems which illustrate an important principle placed together. The reason for this is obvious. Still, the order of the problems in the different books is approximately the same as the order of the propositions in the most popular text-books. On account of this difference in order it will be best to keep the text-book work somewhat ahead, unless one cares to select the problems beforehand to give out with the text-book lesson. Some may prefer to use the problems only with the review of the geometry.

Boys preparing for college will certainly take a lively interest in the questions, problems, and exercises selected from the college entrance papers.

The entrance papers were selected with great care, with the hope that they may prove helpfully suggestive both to teachers and pupils.

The discussion of logarithms, the explanation of their use, and the use of the table have been made as simple and clear as possible.

Only such symbols are used as are almost universally employed.

Some few proofs are put in because they are not found in all the text-books.

Notice of errors, or any suggestion, will be gratefully received.

HOTCHKISS SCHOOL,

LAKEVILLE, CONN., January 8, 1897.

J. G. ESTILL.

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