The Progressive Higher Arithmetic: For Schools, Academies, and Mercantile Colleges : Forming a Complete Treatise on Arithmetical Science, and Its Commercial and Business Applications

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Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Company, 1875 - Arithmetic - 456 pages
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Page 171 - DRY MEASURE 2 pints (pt.) = 1 quart (qt.) 8 quarts =1 peck (pk.) 4 pecks = 1 bushel (bu...
Page 391 - ... from the left hand period, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a dividend.
Page 382 - The Square Root of a number is one of the two equal factors that produce the number ; thus the square root of 49 is 7, for 7 X 7 = 49.
Page 385 - Multiply the divisor, thus increased, by the last figure of the root; subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend.
Page 353 - Multiply each payment by its term of credit, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments • the quotient will be the average term of credit.
Page 453 - That from and after the passage of this act, it shall be lawful throughout the United States of America to employ the weights and measures of the metric system ; and no contract or dealing, or pleading in any court, shall be deemed invalid or liable to objection, because the weights or measures expressed or referred to therein are weights or measures of the metric system.
Page 425 - The square of the base, or of the perpendicular, of a right-angled triangle is equal to the square of the hypothenuse diminished by the square of the other side.
Page 94 - RULE. Multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fraction ; to the product add the numerator, and under the sum write the denominator.
Page 441 - The volumes of similar solids are to each other as the cubes of their like dimensions.
Page 428 - A circle is a plane figure bounded by a curved line, called the circumference, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.

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