Walking Denver: 30 Tours of the Mile-High CityÕs Best Urban Trails, Historic Architecture, River and Creekside Paths, and Cultural Highlights

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Wilderness Press, Oct 9, 2013 - Travel - 232 pages
10 Reviews
Its mild climate and abundant sunshine make Denver, one of America’s fittest cities, a welcoming place for a walk any time of year. Colorado’s capital is the country’s fifth most walkable city. There is so much to see when out for a stroll through downtown or a hike in the nearby foothills. This exceptional guide explores the best of the city from Dinosaur Ridge and Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre to the Mile High Loop in City Park and public art scattered throughout downtown.

These 30 specially designed urban treks are not only good exercise but are a great way to soak up the history, culture, parks, and vibe of the Mile High City. The walk’s commentary includes trivia about architecture, local culture, and neighborhood history, plus tips on where to dine, have a drink, or shop. Each tour includes a clear neighborhood map and vital public transportation (where appropriate) and parking information. Route summaries make each walk easy to follow, and a “Points of Interest” section lists each walk’s highlights.

Insider Mindy Sink guides the urban adventurer from the Mile High Loop, the city’s newest footpath in City Park, to the Golden Triangle’s cultural and architectural gems, and the ever lively Art District on Santa Fe. From the Auraria Campus (home to three universities), to the city’s oldest still operating cemetery, this book reveals part of the city even seasoned locals overlook.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MichaelGroesbeck - LibraryThing

I have lived in northern Colorado for over 40 years, and had never seen Denver as "Walking Denver" has shown it to me. I recommend this book to anyone who has never taken the time to slow down and take a walk. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - 23blue - LibraryThing

This is a quick little book that is easy to pick up and have a mini history lesson in 5 minutes. Most of the walks are very short and that makes it a great thing to keep in the car for whenever you ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
WALK 1 Capitol Hill
2
WALK 2 Civic Center Park and Golden Triangle
10
WALK 3 Art District on Santa Fe
18
WALK 4 Auraria Campus
24
WALK 5 LoDo
30
WALK 6 16th Street MallDowntown
38
Confluence and Commons Parks
46
WALK 18 Cherry Creek North Country Club Historic District
124
WALK 19 Washington Park
132
WALK 20 SoBo Baker Historic Neighborhood
140
WALK 21 Platt Park South Pearl Street
148
WALK 22 University of Denver Campus
154
WALK 23 Arapahoe Acres
162
WALK 24 Downtown Littleton
168
WALK 25 Morrison Bear Creek Lake Park
174

WALK 8 LoHi
54
WALK 9 Highlands Square
62
WALK 10 Sloans Lake Park
68
WALK 11 Tennyson Street
76
WALK 12 Riverside Cemetery
82
WALK 13 Five Points Curtis Park and San Rafael Historic Districts
92
WALK 14 Mile High Loop in City Park
100
WALK 15 Park Hill
106
WALK 16 Wyman Historic District Uptownl
112
WALK 17 Cheesman Park
118
WALK 26 Red Rocks Park Amphitheatre
180
WALK 27 Dinosaur Ridge
186
WALK 28 Downtown Golden
192
WALK 29 Lookout Mountain Nature Center Preserve
200
WALK 30 Fairmount Cemetery
206
Walks By Theme
212
Points of Interest
215
Index
229
About the Author
232
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Journalist Mindy Sink chooses to live in the heart of Denver where she enjoys walking to downtown, the Platte River, parks, museums, libraries and much more that the Mile High City has to offer. She is the author of Moon Denver and coauthor of Colorado Organic: Cooking Seasonally, Eating Locally.

While working as the Bureau Manager at the New York Times Rocky Mountain Bureau, Mindy walked to work downtown, but these days she prefers to explore Denver with her 5-year-old daughter and husband. “I feel as if I’ve rediscovered Denver through my daughter’s eyes,” Mindy says. “A walk to the store is an opportunity to hear the birds sing, smell the flowers, and discuss the public art we pass.”

Bibliographic information