Dudley Docker: The Life and Times of a Trade Warrior

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 22, 2004 - Business & Economics - 308 pages
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Dudley Docker (1862-1944) was one of the most powerful European businessmen of his era, through his secretiveness and taste for intrigue served to obscure his importance. This book is a feat of detection and historical reconstruction which establishes him as a figure of substantial influence. Like all good business history it transcends narrow departmental interests. It is a solid mixture of business, economic, political, social and even diplomatic history. It sketches the life and times of Docker: it describes the deals he fixed, recounts the rise and fall of the companies he directed, but also recreates the milieu in which he worked and portrays British socio-economic history from his standpoint. The book's chief theme is the decline of British industrial hegemony since 1880.
  

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Contents

Dudley Docker and his world
1
Domestic life and early career
11
Birminghams industrial titan 190214
24
Business Leagues and Business Newspapers 190514
55
The Great War 191418
84
The Federation of British Industries and the British Commonwealth Union 191622
105
Diplomacy the British Trade Corporation and the British Stockbrockers Trust 191625
133
Armaments electricity and rollingstock 191729
155
Interwar politics 192239
187
International electrical and railway trusts 191444
199
Birmingham Small Arms 191844
214
Conclusion
234
Notes
237
Bibliography
277
Index
285
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About the author (2004)

Richard Davenport-Hines is the recipient of the Wolfson Prize for History and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He writes for the "New York Times, TLS, Sunday Times", and "The Independent". He lives in London.

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